Doctoral Program in Counseling in Central America and Caribbean

View all PhD Programs in Counseling in Central America and Caribbean 2017

Counseling

The PhD can vary depending on the institution and country in which it is awarded. Most scholars pursue a PhD because of strong motivation to contribute to the academic community as well as true curiosity about their chosen field of study. 

 

A doctorate in Counseling & Psychology will incorporate counseling as a field. This equips students with professional skills that will enable you deal with theories, evidences and research issues in an integrated manner while accommodating individual and cultural diversity. You will get pastoral care and counseling so as to work in both private and public places with quality skills, knowledge and skills. The course is offered at Liberty University, and Walden University among other known institutions worldwide.

Central America is the central geographic region of the Americas. It is the southernmost, isthmian portion of the North American continent, which connects with South America on the southeast.

View all Doctoral Programs in Counseling in Central America and Caribbean 2017

Read More

Doctorate in Social Work

International University For Graduate Studies - IUGS
Campus Part time February 2017 Dominica Portsmouth

The primary mission of the educational programmes in Social Work is consistent with the mission of the profession: to enhance human well-being and help meet the basic human needs of all people, with particular attention to the needs and empowerment of people who are vulnerable, oppressed, and living in poverty. [+]

Doctorate Programs in Counseling in Central America and Caribbean 2017. Instructional Philosophy and Mission The primary mission of the educational programmes in Social Work is consistent with the mission of the profession: to enhance human well-being and help meet the basic human needs of all people, with particular attention to the needs and empowerment of people who are vulnerable, oppressed, and living in poverty. The Social Work Doctoral Programme philosophy at IUGS reflects this mission. A historic and defining feature of Social Work is the profession’s focus on individual well-being in a social context and the well-being of society. Fundamental to Social Work is attention to the environmental forces that create, contribute to, and address problems in living. Social workers promote social justice and social change with and on behalf of clients. “Clients” is used inclusively to refer to individuals, families, groups, organisations, and communities. Social workers are sensitive to cultural and ethnic diversity and strive to end discrimination, oppression, poverty, and other forms of social injustice. These activities may be in the form of direct practice, community organising, supervision, consultation administration, advocacy, social and political action, policy development and implementation, education, and research and evaluation. Social workers seek to enhance the capacity of people to address their own needs. Social workers also seek to promote the responsiveness of organisations, communities, and other social institutions to individuals’ needs and social problems. The mission of the Social Work profession is rooted in a set of core values. These core values, embraced by social workers throughout the profession’s history, are the foundation of social work’s unique purpose and perspective: service, social justice, dignity and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, integrity, and competence. This constellation of core values reflects what is unique to the social work profession. Core values, and the principles that flow from them, must be balanced within the context and complexity of the human experience (NASW 2008). Degrees Offered IUGS offers a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Social Work and Doctor of Social Work (DSW). The PhD is designed to prepare the social work professional to engage in research, teaching and academic leadership in the field as well as provide advanced social work services to organisations, governments, communities and individuals. The Doctor of Social Work is designed to enhance the student’s capacity to work in applied social work settings where advanced knowledge can help them further their ability to provide social work services. The PhD Dissertation tends to be theoretical and involves more secondary then primary research. The DSW Project tends to seek a practical solution or outcome for a question or need. It involves more primary then secondary research. Course Content Domains and Requirements Required course domains (or equivalency as assessed and approved by the Dean of Faculty) for Doctoral Degrees in Social Work include: Social welfare and organisational policy; Human growth and development; Abnormal psychology; Systems theory; Special Needs Populations; Social Work methods; Social Work practicum; Research methods; Relevant social work electives; Courses required to be taken at IUGS are as follows, in sequence: Research I (3 credits); Research II (3 credits); Dissertation or Doctoral Project (18 credits) and Dissertation Defense or Oral Project Examination (18 credits); Graduate Seminar (3 credits). A minimum of 85% mastery of examination materials is required. Instructional Requirements, Strategies, and Sequence A total of 93 post-baccalaureate credit hours are required for Doctoral Degrees, a minimum of 27 credits must be taken at IUGS. Some of these may be taken via independent study or at other post-baccalaureate institutions approved by the Dean. Up to 66 post-baccalaureate academic credits may be transferred from other accredited post-baccalaureate academic institutions according to IUGS’s Advanced Standing Academic Credit Transfer Policy. Only grades of “C” or better will be accepted in transfer for academic standing. In addition the students overall average must be “B” or better. Instructional methods include: Review and, as approved, acceptance of previous relevant post-baccalaureate coursework that meets the criteria of IUGS for advanced standing academic credit transfer. As needed, independent study or courses completed at other post-baccalaureate institutions approved by the Dean to complete the required coursework. Assigned readings of texts and academic journal articles. Interactive lectures. Small group discussions. Use of electronic media (Questia online library provided by the University and other selections by the student, mentor, and the Dean). The instructional requirements and sequence include the following coursework to be successfully completed at IUGS: Social Work Research & Design I (3) credits; Social Work Research Design II (3) credits; Upon completion of the research requirements, mentor-based development of the Doctoral Dissertation or Project; Dissertation and Oral Defence or Doctoral Project and Oral Examination (18) credits; On-site oral panel defence of the PhD Dissertation or Oral Examination of the Doctoral Project; The 8-day Graduate Seminar at the 10-day Residency Programme. A minimum of 85% mastery of examination materials. For both Doctoral Degrees, Social Work Research Design I must be completed, approved, and filed before work on Research Design II begins. Social Work Research and Design I and II are prerequisites to undertaking the Dissertation or the Doctoral Project. The Dissertation and Doctoral Project, are not prerequisites for the Graduate Seminar. However, it is recommended that all required coursework prior to the research courses be completed. The Graduate Seminar may be completed at any time during the degree candidate’s matriculation at IUGS, but it must be completed prior to fulfilling their academic requirements. Intended Competencies and Outcomes Upon completion of their degrees, Social Work graduates will demonstrate competencies and outcomes in the following areas of scholarship and practice: Comprehensive knowledge of Social Work theory and practice via literature review, bibliography, and development of annotated outline; Thorough knowledge of research methodologies via formulation of a social work research question and selection of appropriate means of data collection and analysis; Well-developed critical thinking skills, including those of analysis and synthesis, along with divergent and convergent processes; Graduate-level writing skills; Ease with verbal discourse about subject matter via Oral Defence and, when appropriate, round-table discussions with peers; 6. Competent practice skills in social work practice with adults, children, adolescents, organisations, and systems. [-]

Doctorate in Marriage and Family Therapy

International University For Graduate Studies - IUGS
Campus Part time February 2017 Dominica Portsmouth

Marriage and Family Therapy [+]

MARRIAGE & FAMILY THERAPY The programme is ideal for mid-career professionals who have academic backgrounds in marriage and family therapy along with considerable clinical practice experience. Many degree candidates are seasoned clinicians with successful histories of marriage and family therapy practice. A doctoral degree is relevant for marriage and family professionals whose career paths have led them to leadership roles in organisational management, higher education, coaching, public policy, and consulting. Each programme is dedicated to maintaining a standard of excellence while understanding the needs of adult learners who are busy professionals. Candidates interact with faculty and staff in a rich, supportive learning community. Degree candidates will study with scholars and professionals from other universities, non-profit organisations, public agencies, local government, international organisations, school systems, private clinical practice, and health care delivery systems. Studies are tailored to the specific learning needs of each individual. Instructional Philosophy and Mission The primary mission of an educational programme in marriage and family therapy coursework is: 1. To develop competent advanced-level Marriage and Family Therapists at point of graduation; 2. To advance and disseminate a valued systemic basis for teaching and practicing marriage and family therapy; 3. To promote culturally-informed and respectful systemic mental health practice; 4. To advance the body of academic literature within the field via the promotion of research about clinical effectiveness, special populations, evidence based practice, and relationship concerns; 5. To promote leadership within the field. Intended Competencies and Outcomes Upon completion of their degrees, Marriage and Family Therapy graduates will demonstrate competencies and outcomes in the following areas of scholarship and practice: Comprehensive knowledge of marriage and family therapy theory and practice via literature review, bibliography, and development of an annotated outline; Thorough knowledge of research methodologies via formulation of a marriage and family therapy research question and selection of appropriate means of data collection and analysis; Well-developed critical thinking skills, including those of analysis, synthesis, along with divergent and convergent processes; Graduate level writing skills; Ease with verbal discourse about subject matter via oral defence and, when appropriate, round table discussions with peers; Competent practice skills in individual, family, couples, and group children with adults, children, adolescents, and the elderly. Course Content Domain Requirements IUGS offers a Doctor of Philosophy, (PhD) degree and a Doctor of Marriage and Family Therapy (DMFT) degree. The PhD is designed to prepare marriage and family therapists to engage in research and academic leadership in the field as well as provide advanced marriage and family therapy services. The Doctor of Marriage and Family Therapy is designed to enhance the student’s capacity to provide advanced marriage and family therapy services. The PhD dissertation tends to be theoretical and involves more secondary then primary research in the chosen area of Marriage and Family Therapy. The DMFT project is oriented toward practical application in a chosen area of Marriage and Family Therapy and tends to involve more primary research. Required course domains (or equivalency as assessed and approved by the Dean of Faculty) for doctoral degrees in Marriage and Family Therapy include: Marriage and family therapy theory; Therapeutic work with special problems, including but not limited to: Substance abuse, family violence, mental illness, poverty, criminal justice, and cultural competency; Marriage and family therapy methods; Counselling and therapy with individuals, families, couples, and groups; Marriage and family therapy practicum; Research methods; Relevant marriage and family therapy electives as approved by the Dean. Instructional Requirements, Strategies, and Sequence A total of 93 post-baccalaureate credit hours are required for doctoral degrees, a minimum of 27 credits must be taken at IUGS. Some of these may be taken via independent study or at other post-baccalaureate institutions approved by the Dean. Up to 66 post-baccalaureate academic credits may be transferred from other accredited post-baccalaureate academic institutions according to IUGS’s Advanced Standing Academic Credit Transfer Policy. Only grades of “C “or better will be accepted in transfer for academic standing. In addition the students overall average must be “B” or better. Instructional methods include: Review and, as approved, acceptance of previous relevant post-baccalaureate coursework that meets the criteria of IUGS for advanced standing academic credit transfer; As needed, independent study or courses completed at other post-baccalaureate institutions approved by the Dean to complete the required coursework; Assigned readings of texts and academic journal articles; Interactive lectures; Small group discussions; Use of electronic media (Questia online library provided by the University and other selections by student, mentor, and Dean). The instructional requirements and sequence include the following coursework to be successfully completed at IUGS: Marriage and Family Therapy Research Design I (3) credits; Marriage and Family Therapy Research Design II (3) credits; Upon completion of the research requirements, mentor-based development of the Doctoral Dissertation or Project; Dissertation and Oral Defence or Doctoral Project and Oral Examination (18) credits; The 8 day Graduate Seminar held at the 10 day Residency (3) credits; On-site oral panel defence of the PhD Dissertation or Oral Examination of the Doctoral Project; A minimum of 85% mastery of examination materials. For both doctoral degrees, Marriage and Family Therapy Research Design I must be completed, approved, and filed before work on Marriage and Family Therapy Research Design II begins. Marriage and Family Therapy Research and Design I and II are prerequisites to undertaking the Dissertation or the Doctoral project. The Dissertation or Doctoral Project is not a prerequisite for the Graduate Seminar. However, it is recommended that all required coursework prior to the research courses be completed. The Graduate Seminar may be completed at any time in the degree candidate’s enrolment at IUGS, but must be completed prior to fulfilling their academic requirements in Marriage and Family Therapy. Course Instructors The instructors and the number of instructors available for each course will vary, but may include: Dean, Faculty of Marriage and Family Therapy; The Mentor; Faculty & Visiting Lecturers; Dissertation or Project Committee Members. [-]

Doctorate in Christian Counselling and Spiritual Direction

International University For Graduate Studies - IUGS
Campus Part time February 2017 Dominica Portsmouth

Christian Counselling and Spiritual Direction [+]

Doctorate Programs in Counseling in Central America and Caribbean 2017. Philosophy The primary mission of the educational programmes in Christian Counselling and Spiritual Direction coursework is: To develop competent, critical reviewers and well-informed researchers, professors and clinicians; To enhance and promote a comprehensive basis for teaching, researching and practicing Christian Counselling and Spiritual Direction; To promote systems that respect the diversity of client populations as well as approaches to research, teaching and clinical practice; To advance the body of academic literature within the field through the promotion of research outcomes and analysis, research and clinical ethics, teaching and clinical effectiveness, special populations, evidence-based practice, and mental health concerns; To inculcate excellence and critical thinking within the field. Outcomes Students must demonstrate the following prior to graduation: A. Comprehensive knowledge of Christian Counselling or Spiritual Direction clinical theory and practice via literature review, bibliography, and the development of an annotated outline for the dissertation or project; Thorough knowledge of research methodologies via formulation of a Christian Counselling or Spiritual Direction research question, and the selection of an appropriate means of data collection and analysis; Well-developed critical thinking skills, including those of analysis and synthesis including approaches in awareness and advantages of qualitative and quantitative research methods; Postgraduate-level written and oral communication skills; Ease with discourse about subject matter via dissertation defence or oral examination and when appropriate at roundtable discussions with peers and faculty; A minimum of 85% mastery of examination materials and ability to participate in analysis of research articles and to translate these articles into components of clinical practice. For Christian Counselling: Ability to effectively utilise well-researched psychological and clinical practices as well as spiritual resources for healing and growth; Ability to move beyond the typical “illness model” by providing psychologically sound therapy that recognises a client's spiritual dimension; Ability to integrate theology and other faith-tradition knowledge, spirituality, the resources of faith communities, the behavioural sciences, and systemic theory. For Spiritual Direction: An integrated spirituality grounded in self-awareness and engagement with modern culture, as well as with classic and contemporary resources in the Christian tradition; Spirituality literacy grounded in biblical, theological and psychological competencies; spirituality praxis through personal engagement around spiritual themes; Professional skills in spiritual direction; Content IUGS offers the following Degrees in Christian Counselling or Spiritual Direction: Master of Arts (MA); Master of Science (MSc); Doctor of Psychology (PsyD); Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). The MSc and PsyD Project is oriented toward practical application in a chosen area of Christian Counselling or Spiritual Direction and tends to involve more primary research. The MA thesis and PhD dissertation tend to be theoretical and involves more secondary then primary research in the chosen area of Christian Counselling or Spiritual Direction. The student’s portfolio and transcripts are examined by the dean after discussion with the student to determine his or her goals. A maximum of 27 (for master's students) or 66 (for doctoral students) credits of advanced standing will be approved after this process. Domains included in these credits as assessed and approved by the Dean of the Faculty of Christian Counselling or Spiritual Direction that may be accepted for advanced stranding include, but are not limited to, the following: For Christian Counselling: Theories of personality and personality development; Interpersonal relations; Marriage and family dynamics; Group dynamics; Personality and culture; Psychopathology; Psychology of religious experience; Theories of counselling and psychotherapy; Personality assessment and statistics; Theories of the pastoral office, including the history and theory of pastoral care; Research methods; Orientation to the helping professions and ethics; For Spiritual Direction: Foundations of Christian Spirituality; Biblical Foundations, Christian Origins, Literature of Ancient Israel; Theological Foundations / Christian Doctrine; Psychological Foundations / Human Person & Psychological Development; Introduction to Spirituality Praxis; Advanced Spiritual Accompaniment Praxis; Spiritual Accompaniment Practicum; Ethics of Pastoral Counselling and Spiritual Direction; Personal Spiritual Direction; Spiritual Paths in World Religions; Christian Moral Theology and Ethics; Spirituality Field Project. Only grades of “C” or better will be accepted in transfer for academic standing. In addition the student's overall average for transfer credits must be “B” or better. Graduation requirements: MA and MSc: 45 post-baccalaureate credits, including the following: A total of 27 post-baccalaureate credits in transfer from other institutions or taken by distance-learning through IUGS; Successful completion of the distance-learning course Research and Design (3 credits); Successful completion of the Graduate Seminar (3 credits); Thesis and Oral Defence, or Project and Oral Examination (12) credits; PsyD: 93 post-baccalaureate credits, including the following: A total of 66 post-baccalaureate credits in transfer from other accredited institutions or taken by distance-learning through IUGS; Successful completion of distance-learning courses Research and Design I and II (6 credits); Successful completion of the 8-day Graduate Seminar at the 10-day Residency (3 credits); Project and Oral Examination (18 credits); PhD: 93 post-baccalaureate credits, including the following: A total of 66 post-baccalaureate credits in transfer (earned before or after admission) or taken by distance-learning through IUGS; Successful completion of distance-learning courses Research and Design I and II (6 credits); Successful completion of the 8-day Graduate Seminar at the 10-day Residency (3 credits); Dissertation and Oral Defence (18 credits). Sequence - Advanced-standing course credits may be taken before or after the student's matriculation at IUGS. Master’s students must complete their 27 credits advanced standing and doctoral students their 66 advanced-standing credits before undertaking Research and Design I. - For doctoral students, Research I must be completed, approved and filed before work begins on Research II. - Research and Design I (and for doctoral students Research and Design II) must be completed, approved and filed before the first draft of the Master’s Project, Thesis, Doctoral Project or Dissertation is submitted. - The Graduate Seminar may be completed at any time during the student’s enrolment at IUGS but must be successfully completed before graduation. Instructional strategies will include, but not be limited to, the following: - Assigned readings of texts and academic journal articles; - Seminar review of these assigned readings; - Interactive lectures; - Small group discussions, where students will evaluated on their level of participation; - Use of electronic media (Questia online library provided by the University and other sources selected by the student, mentor, and Dean); - Examinations (cumulative and comprehensive examinations to ensure subject-matte [-]