Part time PhD Program in Film in Europe

Find Part time PhD Programs in Film in Europe 2017

Film

The most popular doctorate is the Doctor of Philosophy or Ph.D. Ph.D.s and other study doctorates prepare graduate student to launch new plans that add to the common knowledge base of the field. Candidates for and holders of Ph.D.s often seek professions as professors and researchers, but many also go on to different roles in the charitable, public, and private sectors.

Europe, one of the world's seven continents, is usually known as the westernmost peninsula of Eurasia. Second smallest continent, with 10,180,000 (km2), the area regroups 50 countries.

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PhD Research Degrees in Media Studies

SOAS University of London
Campus Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London

Media and Film Studies at SOAS has an expanding programme of doctoral research with some thirty research students currently enrolled. Our research students work on an exceptionally wide range of topics, both theoretical and empirical, with about half coming from Africa, the Middle East and Asia, and half from Europe and North America. [+]

Top Part time PhDs in Film in Europe. Research Degrees in Media Studies Media and Film Studies at SOAS has an expanding programme of doctoral research with some thirty research students currently enrolled. Our research students work on an exceptionally wide range of topics, both theoretical and empirical, with about half coming from Africa, the Middle East and Asia, and half from Europe and North America. The Centre puts emphasis on the acquisition of critical theoretical skills and in-depth regional, linguistic and cultural knowledge of media and film forms and practices. The PhD in Media and Film Studies is a research degree, involving original research on some aspect of contemporary theoretical and global issues in media and film. Our approach to media and film studies involves a developed critique of Eurocentrism. Our speciality is the analysis of the film and media industries, their contents and their audiences in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and their diasporas, an approach equally well-suited to research on Latin American, East European and mainstream ‘Western' media. In 2007 we opened a PhD stream designed to integrate and interrogate the relationships between theory and practice. The submitted work comprises 60,000 words of written work and up to one hour of audio-visual materials. A research degree in media and film normally takes three years, or up to a maximum of four years should extensive periods of fieldwork be required. Part-time registration is also possible. The Centre stresses interdisciplinarity and draws upon expertise right across the School. So the PhD Programme is equally suited to researchers who wish to engage in detailed study of media and film in Asia or Africa and to those who wish to combine media and film studies with other disciplines, ranging from the study of language and culture through the humanities to the social sciences. We consider research students to be one of our main research strengths and advise them to develop a portfolio of projects, whether individual or collaborative, which will be relevant to their future careers. In their final year, we also encourage them to organize symposia and film festivals based on their fields of special expertise and aimed at a broader audience. For example, the student-led Sacredmediacow collective organised a conference on media in India and produced an edited book, Indian Mass Media and the Politics of Change, which was published by Routledge. Other students have become involved with the organization of the Small Media Initiative (smallmediainitiative.com) events every autumn. Many students also give papers at national and international conferences and some publish in academic journals. For details about requirements and structure of the programme, or to see profiles of current research students please follow the links in the menu. Academic Staff and their Research Areas Dr Elisa Oreglia PhD, MIMS, (University of California Berkeley) China and Southeast Asia, particularly Myanmar; Information and Communication Technologies and Development (ICTD); Information Society and digital divides; localized information sharing practices and media production; intermediation in digital media use; rural markets and new media. Dr Dina Matar, MSc PhD (London) Middle East, especially the Arab world; international political communication; Arab cultural politics; Arab cultural studies; memory studies and oral history; Islamist movements; social movements and media; diasporas; ethnic minorities; transnational movements and communications. Dr Somnath Batabyal, MA (SOAS), PhD (SOAS) Southeast Asia with a focus on India; transnational news spheres with a special focus on India; Development discourses in India and its articulation in mainstream and alternate news forums; environmental politics. Dr Jaeho Kang, MA (Korea); PhD (Cambridge University) East Asia; Korea, China and Japan; critical theory; media theory; East Asian cultural studies; political communication; media and urban spaces in East Asian cities; New media and democracy; media spectacle and global mega events [-]

MPhil/PhD Research Degrees in Film Studies

SOAS University of London
Campus Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London

The Centre for Film and Screen Studies invites applications for disciplinary and interdisciplinary research in Film and Screen Studies with particular reference to Africa, Asia and the Near and Middle East. The Centre’s geographical focus on film/screen industries and movements beyond the dominant Western ‘global’ Hollywood and European economies of production, distribution and exhibition, makes the Centre unique in its approach. We are also keen to promote research on the transnational, transcultural and multi-media nature of the image in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. [+]

Research Degrees in Film Studies The Centre for Film and Screen Studies invites applications for disciplinary and interdisciplinary research in Film and Screen Studies with particular reference to Africa, Asia and the Near and Middle East. The Centre’s geographical focus on film/screen industries and movements beyond the dominant Western ‘global’ Hollywood and European economies of production, distribution and exhibition, makes the Centre unique in its approach. We are also keen to promote research on the transnational, transcultural and multi-media nature of the image in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In a ‘global’ industry, film and media scholars and practitioners are increasingly recognising the need for a move toward the study of image cultures and industries beyond the historical hegemonies of the European and Hollywood industries. The range of expertise in non-Western film/screen studies and cultures offered at SOAS provides a unique opportunity to respond and contribute to current critical and theoretical debates in these disciplines by providing a vibrant intellectual home for research students with an interest in film and screen studies. Programme Convenor: Lindiwe Dovey [-]

PhD Film: Practice by Research

University of Kent, School of Arts
Campus Part time 3 - 6 years August 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury

One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage... [+]

Top Part time PhDs in Film in Europe. PhD Film: Practice by Research The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. It was ranked second in the UK for research power in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema. Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campus based film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research. In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing. Course structure Postgraduate students are supervised via a research team through regular meetings. Research supervision draws on wide staff interests in North American, European, and Latin American cinemas, offering opportunities to study projects based in aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives on film and digital media, as well as practice by research. For further details, see staff research interests below. In addition, research students participate in a series of regular events. These include work-inprogress seminars and professional development workshops, both of which are organised at School level. Research students are also able to enrol on the Graduate School’s Researcher Development Programme. Our research students also actively participate in a research seminar, which brings leading scholars and practitioners to Kent. We also hold an annual postgraduate presentation day. Postgraduate resources Film at Kent has excellent viewing and library facilities, with a large number of films screened weekly during term on 35mm and Blu-Ray. The Templeman Library has extensive book and specialist journal holdings in film and related areas; there is also a large and growing reference collection of film on DVD, with individual and group viewing facilities. The Department also benefits from the presence of the Gulbenkian Cinema on campus, which runs a programme of new releases and classics. In 2010, we moved into the purpose-built, and RIBA award-winning, Jarman Building. The new building is home to a range of professional standard editing and studio facilities, plus a dedicated postgraduate centre and teaching and social spaces. Internationally recognised research Our staff produce internationally recognised research at the intersection of film theory, history, practice, and the conceptual and stylistic analysis of moving image media. Based on this expertise, we are able to support research across a wide range of topics, including: moving image theory, history and criticism; American, European and Latin American cinemas; British Cinema; the avantgarde; and digital media and animation. There are also close connections between Film and the Aesthetics Research Group. The Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image promotes our excellence in research and hosts a range of research events including symposia, visiting speakers and workshops. A recently established affiliation with the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) in London offers the possibility of collaborative projects, internships, postgraduate events and activities as well as free membership to all postgraduate students. Film-making The Department includes film-makers among its members of staff. Clio Barnard’s recent film The Arbor was nominated for a BAFTA and Clio received the best newcomer and original debut feature at the London Film Festival and best new documentary film-maker at the Tribeca Film Festival. Her most recent work, The Selfish Giant, was chosen as one of only two films to represent the UK in the Directors’ Fortnight line-up at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival. Virginia Pitts’ films Trust Me (2001) and Fleeting Beauty (2004) were selected to screen at 25 international film festivals, toured US art galleries and sold widely to television. Her latest film, Beat (2010), a narrative-dance piece exploring dialogism as an ideal for human interaction, is currently on the international festival circuit where it has been nominated for awards in New Zealand, Canada, the US and Greece. Lawrence Jackson worked in various crew capacities in the UK film industry for three years before working in-house, then freelance as a Bi-Media Producer for BBC Northern Ireland Drama. As writer-director, he has five short films and as producer-director, around 50 hours of radio drama to his name. The shorts, shot in locations from Margate to Northern Ireland and Prague to Newcastle, have been shown at the Munich Film Festival, London’s ICA Cinema and on BBC2. Entry requirements An MA in a relevant subject. [-]

PhD Film

University of Kent, School of Arts
Campus Part time 3 - 6 years August 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury

One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment... [+]

PhD Film The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. It was ranked second in the UK for research power in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema. Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campus based film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research. In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing. Course structure Postgraduate students are supervised via a research team through regular meetings. Research supervision draws on wide staff interests in North American, European, and Latin American cinemas, offering opportunities to study projects based in aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives on film and digital media, as well as practice by research. For further details, see staff research interests. In addition, research students participate in a series of regular events. These include work-inprogress seminars and professional development workshops, both of which are organised at School level. Research students are also able to enrol on the Graduate School’s Researcher Development Programme. Our research students also actively participate in a research seminar, which brings leading scholars and practitioners to Kent. We also hold an annual postgraduate presentation day. Postgraduate resources Film at Kent has excellent viewing and library facilities, with a large number of films screened weekly during term on 35mm and Blu-Ray. The Templeman Library has extensive book and specialist journal holdings in film and related areas; there is also a large and growing reference collection of film on DVD, with individual and group viewing facilities. The Department also benefits from the presence of the Gulbenkian Cinema on campus, which runs a programme of new releases and classics. In 2010, we moved into the purpose-built, and RIBA award-winning, Jarman Building. The new building is home to a range of professional standard editing and studio facilities, plus a dedicated postgraduate centre and teaching and social spaces. Internationally recognised research Our staff produce internationally recognised research at the intersection of film theory, history, practice, and the conceptual and stylistic analysis of moving image media. Based on this expertise, we are able to support research across a wide range of topics, including: moving image theory, history and criticism; American, European and Latin American cinemas; British Cinema; the avantgarde; and digital media and animation. There are also close connections between Film and the Aesthetics Research Group. The Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image promotes our excellence in research and hosts a range of research events including symposia, visiting speakers and workshops. A recently established affiliation with the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) in London offers the possibility of collaborative projects, internships, postgraduate events and activities as well as free membership to all postgraduate students. Film-making The Department includes film-makers among its members of staff. Clio Barnard’s recent film The Arbor was nominated for a BAFTA and Clio received the best newcomer and original debut feature at the London Film Festival and best new documentary film-maker at the Tribeca Film Festival. Her most recent work, The Selfish Giant, was chosen as one of only two films to represent the UK in the Directors’ Fortnight line-up at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival. Virginia Pitts’ films Trust Me (2001) and Fleeting Beauty (2004) were selected to screen at 25 international film festivals, toured US art galleries and sold widely to television. Her latest film, Beat (2010), a narrative-dance piece exploring dialogism as an ideal for human interaction, is currently on the international festival circuit where it has been nominated for awards in New Zealand, Canada, the US and Greece. Lawrence Jackson worked in various crew capacities in the UK film industry for three years before working in-house, then freelance as a Bi-Media Producer for BBC Northern Ireland Drama. As writer-director, he has five short films and as producer-director, around 50 hours of radio drama to his name. The shorts, shot in locations from Margate to Northern Ireland and Prague to Newcastle, have been shown at the Munich Film Festival, London’s ICA Cinema and on BBC2. Entry requirements A first or 2.1 honours degree in a relevant subject for the MA; an MA for the PhD [-]