Part time Doctorate Program in Humanities and Social Sciences in San Francisco in USA

Compare Part time PhD Programs in Humanities and Social Sciences in San Francisco USA 2017

Humanities and Social Sciences

A PhD, also known as a Doctor of Philosophy degree, is a doctorate awarded by a university to the academic who has met all necessary qualifications and can now be considered a doctor in his or her academic field.

A PhD in Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences focuses on human thoughts and culture. It is an advanced level of education, often focusing on student teacher relationships, advanced research methods, and higher tier courses.

The USA remains the world’s most popular destination for international students. Universities in the US dominate the world rankings and the country also offers a wide variety of exciting study locations. State university systems are partially subsidized by state governments, and may have many campuses spread around the state, with hundreds of thousands of students.

San Francisco is leading financial and cultural hub of California. Along with other contemporary subject the higher education institution in the city is well known for degrees in health and biomedical sciences.

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Special Education (Ed.D.)

University of San Francisco - School of Education
Campus Part time 5 years August 2017 USA San Francisco

With a focus on equity, access, and inclusion, the Ed.D. in Special Education prepares students for research, leadership, and higher education teaching. [+]

Part time Doctors of Philosophy in Humanities and Social Sciences in San Francisco in USA. Disability. Equity. Culture. With a focus on equity, access, and inclusion, the Ed.D. in Special Education prepares students for research, leadership, and higher education teaching. Our interdisciplinary approach, allows students to draw from, critique, and contribute various perspectives on disability and its intersection with other social markers — to advocate for, and walk in solidarity with people with disabilities. Program coursework provides a strong methodological and theoretical foundation, and prepares students for three practicum experiences: higher education teaching, research, and school consultation and collaboration, providing opportunities for career advancement. In each practicum, students are matched with a faculty mentor from USF or another university and given the opportunity to take part in a research study, teach a graduate level course, or collaborate with a community-based organization. Program Details The doctoral program consists of 60 credit hours of study beyond the master's degree and culminates in the completion of a doctoral dissertation. By taking 12-15 credits per year, students can complete the doctoral program in five years. Upon completion of the program, graduates will be able to conduct meaningful research related to the issues and challenges faced by students with disabilities, provide evidence-based teacher education, and collaborate with school personnel to improve the educational outcomes of students with disabilities. They will be able to consider and address a variety of cultural, linguistic, socioeconomic, contextual, and communicative factors as they prepare future K-12 special education teachers to serve students with disabilities. Program Delivery To meet the needs of working professionals, the program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester (Friday evenings and all day Saturdays). Course Details Students can complete the Ed.D. in Special Education program in five years or less depending upon how many courses are taken in a semester. Learning Outcomes The Doctoral Program in Special Education Student Learning Outcomes: The faculty in the Doctoral Program in Special Education will provide students with foundational-level skills for scholarship in learning and instruction. Students will demonstrate an understanding of data-analysis skills. Students will demonstrate scholarly analysis of research articles. Students will demonstrate scholarly writing. The faculty in the Doctoral Program in Special Education will provide students with advanced-level skills for scholarship in learning and instruction. Students will demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate standardized assessment instruments of their own choosing. Students will demonstrate the ability to write results sections of research studies. Students will demonstrate the ability to apply literature review techniques to a subject of their own choosing. The faculty in the Doctoral Program in Special Education will provide students with the ability to design, conduct, and communicate original research of their own choosing. Students will communicate original research Students will design, conduct, and write up original research of their own choosing. Visit our website here to learn more about this program Financial Resources Federal financial aid, state, and university resources are available as funding to newly admitted and current USF School of Education students. In order to offset the cost of graduate education tuition, many School of Education courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening, and/or on alternating weekends. Most students find they can maintain a full time job while earning their credential, master’s or doctoral degree. However, if your program requires you to spend time in a classroom (i.e. student teaching) or to complete a fieldwork or traineeship experience, such commitments will interfere with a normal workday.     Visit our website to learn more about financial resources for this program [-]

Organization and Leadership (Ed.D.)

University of San Francisco - School of Education
Campus Part time 5 years August 2017 USA San Francisco

The Doctorate of Education (Ed.D.) in Organization and Leadership is a unique program for working professionals who see themselves as educational leaders transforming their organizations through a learning perspective. [+]

Preparing leaders who serve schools, community and social agencies, government, and non-profit institutions in a regional and international world. The Doctorate of Education (Ed.D.) in Organization and Leadership is a unique program for working professionals who see themselves as educational leaders transforming their organizations through a learning perspective. Program Details The Organization and Leadership (O&L) Doctoral program is comprised of 60 credits of study beyond the master's degree and culminates in the completion of a doctoral dissertation. Program Delivery To meet the needs of working professionals, the program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester (Friday evenings and all day Saturdays). “The size and structure of the program were appealing to me, a working professional and parent, and I was intrigued by the opportunities that existed to form strong bonds and work closely with my peers and instructors. I can confidently say that my greatest expectations were fulfilled. I had the opportunity to travel abroad, participate in experiential learning, establish close relationships, and work with dedicated and phenomenally talented professors and incredibly motivated scholars.” - Demerris R. Brooks-Immel, O&L Ed.D. Alumna Learning Outcomes The Organization and Leadership Program Learning Outcomes: The program brings before students a continuum of new knowledge and understanding that reflects current theories, research, and innovative practices. The program equips students to apply the principles of leadership theory in a broad range of settings to effectively lead individuals and organizations to success. The program equips students to select, implement, and manage appropriate leadership methodologies to meet individual, group, and organizational needs in K-12 through higher education, for-profit, and nonprofit settings. The program equips students to utilize and conduct research to evaluate and improve organizational processes. Create leaders who are able to critically examine organizations in order to promote equitable outcomes. Foster advocacy for social justice with a consciousness around the experiences and challenges facing historically underrepresented groups. Understand and apply research to problems of practice. Develop leaders who are self-reflective of their practice and its implications for social justice and equity. The Organizational and Leadership Program Student Learning Outcomes: Graduates will have acquired the knowledge, understanding, tools and skills necessary to assume leadership roles in organizations at the local, state, national and international levels. Graduates will have an understanding of research methods and demonstrate competencies to engage in rigorous scholarship. Graduates will be able to relate theory to practice and demonstrate synthesis of advanced knowledge by improving organizations. Graduates will have adopted habits of personal and scholarly reflections that examine professional practice and lead to systemic renewal. Careers Graduates of the O&L doctoral program are educators who work in leadership, management, research, and all levels of teaching in the fields of education, business, health, government, consulting, and profit and non-profit settings. EXAMPLES OF CAREER OPTIONS INCLUDE: Higher Education Administration University Professor Management Consultant Applied Researcher Principal Superintendent Financial Resources Federal financial aid, state, and university resources are available as funding to newly admitted and current USF School of Education students. In order to offset the cost of graduate education tuition, many School of Education courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening, and/or on alternating weekends. Most students find they can maintain a full time job while earning their credential, master’s or doctoral degree. However, if your program requires you to spend time in a classroom (i.e. student teaching) or to complete a fieldwork or traineeship experience, such commitments will interfere with a normal workday.     Visit our website to learn more about financial resources for this program Visit our website here to learn more about this program [-]

International and Multicultural Education (Ed.D.)

University of San Francisco - School of Education
Campus Part time 5 years August 2017 USA San Francisco

The <strong>Ed.D. in International and Multicultural Education (IME)</strong> is dedicated to understanding formal and informal education within diverse sociocultural, linguistic, political and economic contexts. [+]

Part time Doctors of Philosophy in Humanities and Social Sciences in San Francisco in USA. Training Critical Scholars and Engaged Practitioners The Ed.D. in International and Multicultural Education (IME) is dedicated to understanding formal and informal education within diverse sociocultural, linguistic, political and economic contexts. Based on principles of equity, social justice, and human rights, the program critically addresses the realities of education within and beyond the borders of public schooling in the United States and around the world. Our program equips students with the skills needed to engage in scholarship, teaching and advocacy work that addresses many of the key issues impacting education today. Visit our website here to learn more about this program Distinctive Program Features Focus on engaged scholarship with a meaningful impact on local and global communities. A cutting edge and intellectually rigorous curriculum grounded in critical pedagogy. A strong sense of community composed of highly diverse faculty and students who offer personal and scholarly support. Apprenticeship opportunities for doctoral students in becoming social justice scholars, practitioners, and advocates. "IME is a family, a group of intelligent loving human beings that feel that social justice is at the core of being an educator. It is a place that is called our second home, a place that we come to when the outside world is frustrating and we need a place of support and reflection. It is this place that thoughts are thrown around honored, respected and gracefully challenged. It is the place that has been present in civilizations since the beginning of time...community." —IME EdD Student Program Delivery The program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester (Friday evenings and all day Saturdays). Program Details The Ed.D. program is grounded in five main conceptual areas: critical social theory and schooling; intersectionality of race, class, nation, language, gender and sexuality in education; human rights and social movements; international and comparative education; and alternative research paradigms. Rooted in the practice of critical pedagogy, this program provides a dynamic learning community where students benefit from rigorous experience both in the classroom and in the community. We believe that IME’s conceptual framework and pedagogy serve to equip students in becoming leaders capable of reimagining possibilities for education in multiple contexts. The International and Multicultural Education (IME) Doctoral Program is comprised of 60 credits of study beyond the master's degree and culminates in the completion of a doctoral dissertation. Students can choose from a range of courses in IME or concentration in either Human Rights Education or Second Language Acquisition. Learning Outcomes The International and Multicultural Education Program Learning Outcomes The goal of each IME program is to develop professional practitioners with expertise in three key areas: Conceptual and Theoretical knowledge: including critical social theory, critical pedagogy, critical race theory and intersectionality, feminist theory, human rights and social movements, and alternative research paradigms. Application skills: analysis, synthesis, and evaluation skills for teaching and research, program/policy development and administration, and local/global social justice/human rights activism. Methodological tools based in qualitative research such as participatory action research, teacher action research, testimonio, and critical ethnography. The International and Multicultural Education Program Student Learning Outcomes The IME programs are designed to enable students upon graduation, to: Use theory as a lens for thinking critically about social inequities in local/global contexts. Work as a transformative professional in schools, universities, and communities to bring about social change. Be a prominent voice in the educational justice movement through scholarship and praxis Design, implement, and assess K-12 and post-secondary classroom/community programs focused on human rights, social justice, and/or critical multicultural education. Financial Resources Federal financial aid, state, and university resources are available as funding to newly admitted and current USF School of Education students. In order to offset the cost of graduate education tuition, many School of Education courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening, and/or on alternating weekends. Most students find they can maintain a full time job while earning their credential, master’s or doctoral degree. However, if your program requires you to spend time in a classroom (i.e. student teaching) or to complete a fieldwork or traineeship experience, such commitments will interfere with a normal workday. Visit our website to learn more about financial resources for this program. Careers Graduates of the IME Doctoral Program work as transformative professionals in a variety of settings both in the U.S. and internationally, such as: CAREER OPTIONS Faculty members at community colleges and universities Teacher leaders in K-12 schools School superintendents Educational researchers Leaders in community and non-governmental organizations Curriculum specialists GRADUATES OF THE IME DOCTORAL PROGRAM Professor and Chair, Urban Education, Loyola Marymount University Professor and Chair, Elementary Education, San Francisco State University Professor, Bilingual and Multicultural Education, California State University, Sacramento Assistant Professor, Reading, Texas Woman's University Faculty, Santa Rosa Junior College and Solano Community College Lecturer, American Studies, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary Director, Bilingual Education, Professional Development and Special Programs, San Jose Unified School District Teacher trainers for international organizations [-]

PhD in East-West Psychology

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Part time 2 years September 2017 USA San Francisco

The program of study consists of a foundational course, research methods courses, research colloquia, advanced seminars, a student-designed area of specialization, two comprehensive exams, and a dissertation. Students focus on a specific area of study and develop methodological skills. [+]

Students complete 36 units of coursework and write a dissertation. The program of study consists of a foundational course, research methods courses, research colloquia, advanced seminars, a student-designed area of specialization, two comprehensive exams, and a dissertation. Students focus on a specific area of study and develop methodological skills. They work closely with their advisors to design an individualized curriculum and participate in research colloquia to articulate their dissertation research project. Ph.D. Program Learning Goals and Objectives Upon completion of the Ph.D. in East-West Psychology, and in addition to M.A. goals and objectives, graduates will be able to: Goal 1. Produce original scholarly works in the field of East-West psychology and spirituality. Objective 1. Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge and expertise in a selected area of specialization within East-West studies. Objective 2. Produce work that creatively and critically interprets, compares, integrates, applies, and/or evaluates knowledge from a variety of Eastern, Western, and indigenous psychological and spiritual traditions. Objective 3. Apply critical thinking in relation to basic and complex issues of East-West cross-cultural hermeneutics, such as orientalism, ethnocentrism, critical pluralism, insider/outsider perspectives, relativism, and/or incommensurability. Goal 2. Carry out scholarly research with a methodology appropriate to their research interests. Objective 1. Design cogent, feasible, and methodologically rigorous research projects. Objective 2. Apply several qualitative and theoretical research methods (e.g., phenomenological, hermeneutic, heuristic, narrative, comparative) to their research interests. Objective 3. Carry out a complete research project that demonstrates professional methodological knowledge and skills. Goal 3. Be competent in a variety of pedagogical, writing, and inquiry skills and be prepared to work professionally as university and college teachers, scholars, and writers. Objective 1. Present verbally their scholarly works and research projects with professionalism, clarity, precision, and creativity. Objective 2. Write original research papers and books according to professional scholarly standards. Objective 3. Incorporate somatic, vital, emotional, imaginal, and spiritual experience and knowledge into scholarly practices, such as research and writing. Dual Ph.D./Certificate Program Courses taken for the East-West Spiritual Counseling Certificate (see About Certificate) can apply toward the East-West Psychology Ph.D. requirements. By enrolling in the certificate program, a doctoral student can fulfill all the units needed in the area of specialization. Visit East-West Psychology Ph.D. Curriculum to see a Dual Ph.D./Certificate Program sample schedule. Comprehensive Examinations During the final year of coursework, doctoral students enroll in two comprehensive examinations designed to demonstrate the student’s knowledge in the program area. For their first comprehensive examination, students take an Advanced Seminar where they need to show mastery of their area of specialization in both an oral presentation and a research paper. The second comprehensive examination takes place at the last Research Colloquia taken by the student, and takes the form of a methodological reflection essay discussing the research method to be used in the dissertation. Alternative Multi-Paper Dissertation Format In addition to the standard format for doctoral dissertations, the department allows for the use of an alternative format that consists of three peer-reviewed papers (two of which must have been published or accepted for publcation; the other is to be either published, accepted for publication, or under review) as the main basis for the dissertation. Students wanting to pursue the multi-paper dissertation format are assessed by the faculty program committee on a case-by-case basis. As with the traditional dissertation, a dissertation proposal is submitted, a committee of three members is formed, and a dissertation defense is held according to existing policies. Ph.D. Full-Time Sample Schedule Duration: Two years of coursework plus dissertation. Note: Students who do not have a background in East-West psychology are required to take up to 12 additional units of courses drawn from the EWP core courses and directed electives, minus equivalencies. Sample: Emphasis on Ecopsychology/Transpersonal Psychology (plus 3 additional units from EWP core courses) Teaching Assistantships A limited number of paid teaching assistantships is available every semester. Possible responsibilities include facilitation of experiential learning, teaching portions of the class, working with students outside the classroom on projects, miscellaneous administrative and logistic tasks, providing feedback to the faculty member on student learning and perceptions, and reading student papers and giving feedback (but not as the only reader). EWP Internships An internship is an opportunity to integrate career-related experience into an academic education through on-the-job training rather than merely employment. Internships are typically a means for students to gain practical experience in their chosen field in a supervised professional work environment. The department provides students with a list of associated organizations in which internships are available: East-West Psychology Department Internship Opportunities, Internships can be carried out as fieldwork up to a maximum of 6 units. EWP Scholarship Program The department offers a scholarship program to support EWP students' presentation of their ongoing work at professional conferences. To be eligible to apply for the scholarships, candidates need to present official notification that the conference's organizing committee has accepted their presentation. Admission Applicants must meet the general admission requirements of the Institute, as well as have an MA in EWP or its equivalent (for example, a background in Humanistic, Jungian, or transpersonal psychology; psychology of religion, or religious studies). For those who do not have a background in East-West Psychology, up to 12 units of courses drawn from the EWP core requirements and directed electives will be required, minus equivalencies (equivalency for graduate courses previously taken is determined by the EWP Admissions Committee on an individual basis). In addition to the Institute's general admission requirements, two letters of recommendation are required from individuals familiar with the applicant's academic work and their preparation for graduate work. Applicants should also submit a sample of their writing (i.e., an outstanding essay, article, or selection from their M.A. thesis). Successful candidates for admission into the EWP Ph.D. program typically have the following qualifications: a vision that is compatible with the program's mission and interdisciplinary nature; a path of personal and/or spiritual growth; sufficient maturity and stability to pursue independent inquiry; competence of communication and dialectical skills; demonstration of respect for a diversity of viewpoints; an openness to multiple ways of knowing and whole-person learning; the ability to clearly articulate educational, professional, and research goals; outstanding scholarly writing skills; the ability to clearly articulate their educational and professional goals; and the capability to identify a prospective area of specialization and/or dissertation topic that is consistent with the program's mission and resources. [-]

PhD in Anthropology and Social Change

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Part time September 2017 USA San Francisco

The Anthropology and Social Change is unique among graduate programs in the United States due to its focus on activist anthropology. [+]

Part time Doctors of Philosophy in Humanities and Social Sciences in San Francisco in USA. The Anthropology and Social Change is unique among graduate programs in the United States due to its focus on activist anthropology. We believe that anthropologists should analyze, discuss, and explore the possible; that they should research alternative institutions; that they need to collectively reflect and debate the dilemmas of other possible worlds. This collective effort of understanding "real utopias" takes the form of analytic and ethnographic study of existing alternatives in the present. In a certain sense, we are a department of postcapitalist studies. However, by this complicated word, postcapitalism, we do not wish to refer to some dreamed-up utopia, nor to a speculative exploration of futuristic scenarios. While we agree with Lewis Mumford on the "importance of building castles in the sky," we see as an even more urgent necessity to study politics of alternatives in the here and now: the need to engage with postcapitalist cultures that are already being built, and to understand other worlds that are already possible. Together with the activists of the World Social Forum, we believe that "another world is possible." The role of the new social movements, we are reminded, is not to conquer the world, but to make it anew. What, then, is the role and responsibility of anthropology and other social sciences? In a world riddled with so many crises, few things appear to be more relevant than systematic research of counter-hegemonic knowledge and practices. Social scientists should leave pessimism for better times. Anthropology, in particular, is well equipped to participate in the "nowtopian" task of constructing social scientific knowledge that looks beyond capitalism, hierarchy, and ecological disaster. The practice and technique of ethnography provides an important model of a possible "postcapitalist" social science. As one contemporary anthropologist, a friend of our program, recently noted, when one "carries out an ethnography, one observes what people do, and then tries to tease out the hidden symbolic, moral, or pragmatic logics that underlie their actions; one tries to get at the way people's habits and actions make sense in ways that they are not themselves completely aware of." We ask our students to do precisely this: to look at those who are creating viable alternatives, to try to figure out what might be the larger implications of what they are already doing, and then to offer those ideas back, not as prescriptions, but as contributions, possibilities-as gifts. This program offers the space and the possibility to engage with many traditions of radical scholarship and emancipatory social science. We believe that anthropologists should analyze, discuss, and explore the possible; that they should research alternative institutions; that they need to collectively reflect and debate the dilemmas of activist anthropology. The collective effort of understanding "real utopias" takes the form of analytic and ethnographic study of real historical alternatives in the present. This, in turn, requires a serious engagement with social movements involved in the production of alternatives. Students are expected to have an excellent command of history, debates, and perspectives of contemporary social movements. These movements exist in the historical, social, and epistemological context of colonization, development, and globalization. As contributors to the book Contesting Development remind us, more then one in six humans now live in slums, over one billion in a world of jobless growth, or no growth. Solutions offered by mainstream social science are often the source of the problem, and our students are expected to have a good understanding of intertwined historical processes of colonization, development, and liberal modernity. The doctoral program is distinctive for its focus on alternatives. What are some of them? Worker cooperatives in Oakland, social centers in Italy, autonomous systems of justice in Guerrero, community gardens in Detroit, occupied self-managed factories in Argentina, "good government" of the Zapatistas, buen vivir (good life) and plurinationalism in Bolivia, participatory democracy in Kerala, solidarity economics of Mondragon, participatory economics in Winnipeg, pedagogy of the block in African-American communities, alternative environmentalism in Afro-Colombian river regions, legal pluralism, autonomy of migration, marginalized medical practices in South Asia, solidarity unionism in New York City, communal agriculture in Malawi, shack dweller democracy in South Africa, Copwatch in LA, biodiversity in Brazil, restorative justice in Ohio, knowledge commons and globalization, independent media, and autonomous food systems in Japan, are only some of the examples of postcapitalist possibilities. There are so many more, and one of the responsibilities of our students is to discover them. The program is distinctive in its emphasis on: Postcapitalist analysis of historical alternatives in the present Global social movements and lost revolutionary treasures Issues of colonialism, globalization, development Anarchist, Marxist, feminist theoretical perspectives Political ecology Integration of activism and scholarship: developing research skills in activist ethnography, intercultural translation, and emancipatory research Many classes include a research component, and the doctoral dissertation is based on activist ethnographic research. Activist ethnographic frameworks include participatory and collaborative research approaches as well as more recent research techniques and strategies associated with militant research and co-research approaches. Part-Time Curriculum Students may pursue a part-time course of study in consultation with their academic advisor. PhD Admissions Requirements Entry into the PhD program in Anthropology and Social Change requires a master's degree. Students with an MA from another school or from another department at CIIS may require up to one additional year of coursework as part of their PhD program. Students with an MA in Anthropology and Social Change from CIIS do not require additional coursework. The Anthropology and Social Change PhD concentration is a residential program. We are interested in creating a convivial community of scholars, not competitive academics; we believe in educating intellectuals and not professionals. We believe that professors and students are co-learners, and that learning, and knowledge production, is a participatory, inclusive, and horizontal process. Our program is probably not the best fit for those who want to be taught in the vertical space of a traditional classroom. Rather, this is a unique and inspiring place for activist scholars who are passionate about co-creating knowledge that is useful, relevant, and integral. Applicants must meet the general admissions requirements of the Institute. In addition, two letters of recommendation, one from an academic advisor or someone familiar with the applicant's ability to do academic work, and one from a supervisor in a recent professional or volunteer setting, are required. Applicants are also asked to include a recent sample of scholarly writing. The required autobiographical statement should describe significant events in the applicant's life that have led to the decision to pursue admission to this department. A goal statement that includes areas of academic interest should be included. Admission to the PhD Program without an MA in Anthropology from CIIS Students entering the PhD program without an MA in Anthropology and Social Change from CIIS are required to take an additional 12 to 15 units of MA-level coursework within the Anthropology and Social Change Program. Students may require an additional year in which to complete these courses. Once students are admitted, advisors will facilitate the drafting of a tailored curriculum contract that incorporates these additional courses and suggests a timeline. These additional courses include three of the following five courses: Ideas for Action: Social Theory for Radical Change Global Social Movements Unthinking Social Science Radical Theory Radical Political Economy [-]

Clinical Psychology (PsyD) Program at CIIS

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Part time 3 - 4 years September 2017 USA San Francisco

The PsyD Program at CIIS is unique. Located in the heart of San Francisco, ours was the first accredited university in North America to offer programs that connect the insights of Western psychology with Eastern spirituality. [+]

The Clinical Psychology (PsyD) Program at CIIS The PsyD Program at CIIS is unique. Located in the heart of San Francisco, ours was the first accredited university in North America to offer programs that connect the insights of Western psychology with Eastern spirituality. We continue today to present a dynamic clinical psychology curriculum that combines the latest scientific research with the world's great wisdom traditions. We believe that such a synthesis permits deep understanding of the human condition, as well as insight into the most effective ways of helping those in need. The PsyD Program is carefully designed to prepare students for practice-focused careers in clinical psychology. As a member of the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology (NCSPP), our practitioner-scholar training model provides broad and general education in clinical psychology that, in addition, integrates depth-psychological, societal, ecological, and spiritual dimensions of human experience into the curriculum. Full time students who enter the program with Regular Standing (those who enter with a BA) typically take three to four years to complete coursework. This is followed by the internship, which takes one year if it is a full-time internship (about forty hours a week), two years if it is a part-time internship (about twenty hours a week). The dissertation also follows coursework and, while it is possible to complete the dissertation in one year, students typically take two years to complete and write up their research. Realistically, a full time student admitted with Regular standing can expect to complete the degree in five to seven years, depending on their choice of internship and the nature of their dissertation project. Advanced - standing students (those who enter with a Master's degree in Psychology, or the equivalent) have the option of completing the program in four years, with three years of reduced-load coursework and concurrent dissertation work, followed by one year of internship. The majority of Advanced Standing students take four and a half to five years to complete the degree Our distinctive approach to clinical psychology training is guided by a vision of clinical practice that emphasizes a holistic and relational approach to the human condition. We teach students the value of open inquiry into self and other. At the center of this inquiry is the whole person who exists in relationship with other persons, with communities, with cultural meaning systems, and with nature. We believe that psychological suffering often has to do with the fracturing of these crucial relationships. Consistent with the visionary CIIS mission, we view the educational process itself as holistic and relational, and we aspire to “walk our talk” as a learning community – one that is creative and transformative on both personal and professional levels. Our course offerings reflect the broad-minded, integrative perspective pioneered at CIIS decades ago. Alan Watts, a leading figure in the transmission of Eastern spirituality to the West, described the American Academy of Asian Studies (which later became CIIS) as “one of the principal roots of what later came to be known, in the early sixties, as the San Francisco Renaissance." During that time, the Bay Area became synonymous with new currents in psychology that continue to transform the field. Like CIIS’s founders, our faculty and students continue to work at psychology’s cutting edge, in its deepest traditions, and toward the project of realizing our most profound human potentials. CIIS is fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WASC-SASC). The PsyD Program is a member of the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology (NCSPP). Graduates of the PsyD program at CIIS are eligible for licensure as psychologists in California and many other states. The San Francisco Bay Area is at the forefront of change in psychology, especially at CIIS. We welcome you to come visit us and learn more about the CIIS/Bay Area psychology experience. Clinical Psychology (PsyD) Program Licensure Graduates of the PsyD program at CIIS are eligible for licensure as psychologists in California and many other states. In fact, over the last five years, according to the EPPP published data, CIIS students scored higher on the national examination than graduates of any APA approved PsyD program in the Bay Area. Apply to the Clinical Psychology (PsyD) Program Emphasizing preparation for clinical practice this program combines rigorous scholarship, supervised clinical experience and practica and internships. PsyD students fulfill a diversity and identity competency requirement by taking three courses connecting clinical practice with culture and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and religion and spirituality. For field experience students can apply to over 90 community agencies, serving a diverse mix of clients. Additionally, they have access to the Institute's exciting array of public programs. Our training philosophy comprises four components: learning in a multicultural context, which integrates practica and classroom work a relational model of learning and training significant reflection on one's clinical practice broad range of scholarship Admission Requirements Admission Application Non-refundable $65 Application Fee Degree Requirement: An undergraduate degree (BA, BS, or the equivalent) from an accredited college or university in Psychology or 12 semester units/18 quarter units of Psychology course work Academic Prerequisites: 12 semester units/18 quarter units of Psychology course work including a Statistics course. Transcripts: Official transcripts from all accredited academic institutions attended within the United States. Transcripts must arrive in their official, sealed envelopes. Minimum GPA of 3.0 at the undergraduate degree-granting institution - for final 60 semester units or 90 quarter units of course work. Academic Writing Sample: A writing sample of eight to ten pages (typed, double-spaced) that demonstrates your capacity to think critically and reflectively and demonstrates graduate level writing abilities. A sample that uses outside sources must include proper citations. You may submit copies of previous work, such as a recent academic paper, article, or report that reflects scholarly abilities. Two Letters of Recommendation: Letters of recommendation will be accepted from academic advisors, professors, professional supervisors, or someone able to attest to your maturity, motivation, and ability to undertake the work required for the PsyD Program. Recommenders should use standard business format and include full contact information-name, email, phone number, and mailing address. Goal Statement: A one-page (typed, double-spaced) statement of your educational and professional objectives. Autobiographical Statement: A four-to-six page (typed, double-spaced) self-reflective, lifespan autobiographical statement discussing your values, emotional and spiritual insights, aspirations, and life experiences that have led to the decision to apply to the PsyD program. International students and individuals who have studied at institutions outside the US and Canada may have additional requirements. Advanced Standing A limited number of Advanced Standing students who have completed an MA or MS degree in psychology (or equivalent) with a GPA of 3.25 and completed 500 practicum hours may be admitted each year. Advanced Standing students complete a reduced number of units in a program that is designed on a case by case basis depending on prior graduate coursework. Students admitted with Advanced Standing must complete all required courses at CIIS or demonstrate prior completion through submission and review of syllabi from prior coursework. Spring Admission into the Psychology Doctoral Program Once accepted into the PsyD program, a limited number of students have the option to enroll in some courses for the spring or summer semester before their Fall semester begins. With the approval of the PsyD department, students can enroll in selected courses prior to commencement of the fall semester, later to join the fall cohort. Students who employ this option reduce the number of courses required during their first and/or second years of study. This option may provide greater latitude to curriculum planning for individual students. Students who begin to take classes in the spring or summer semesters are considered members of the student cohort that officially begins in the fall semester of the year that they are admitted and will move through the practicum sequence with that cohort. [-]