Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology in San Francisco in USA

Search PhD Programs in Sociology 2017 in San Francisco in USA

Sociology

A PhD is the abbreviation for Doctor of philosophy. This degree is a post graduate program delivered to a high level student researcher who has done deep research in a specific field or subject.

This area of study entails the coexistence between different groups of people. An advanced study in this area of study will enable you to make better decisions when helping people. You will have knowledge on how to come up with strategies that will improve people's lives.

The United States of America is a large country in North America, often referred to as the "USA", the "US", the "United States", "America", or simply "the States". American colleges are funded by "tuition" charged to the student, which is often quite expensive, very commonly reaching into the tens of thousands of dollars per year.

San Francisco is leading financial and cultural hub of California. Along with other contemporary subject the higher education institution in the city is well known for degrees in health and biomedical sciences.

Request Information Doctoral Programs in Sociology in San Francisco in USA 2017

Read More

PhD in Women’s Spirituality

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Full time September 2017 USA San Francisco

The Women's Spirituality program is located at the intersection of Women/Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies, Philosophy, and Religion. Our program honors the spiritual impulse to redress the suppression of the sacred feminine and the oppression of women. [+]

Doctorate Degrees in Sociology in San Francisco in USA. PhD in Philosophy and Religion with Concentration in Women's Spirituality The Women's Spirituality program is located at the intersection of Women/Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies, Philosophy, and Religion. Our program honors the spiritual impulse to redress the suppression of the sacred feminine and the oppression of women. We join with those who seek to end the exploitation of marginalized social groups and address the suffering of the Earth and its many species. Our faculty is internationally known and includes many pioneers in the interdisciplinary field of Women’s Spirituality. Overview Founded by internationally known trailblazers in the women's spirituality movement, this doctoral program is located at the intersection of women/gender studies, ethnic studies, religious studies, and philosophy. Through evening and weekend classes, online courses, and a semi-distance option, the program offers you a flexible format that allows you to integrate your studies with your professional and/or family life. Our PhD program: Offers you rigorous academic training that is grounded in transdisciplinary, spiritual, and feminist methodologies Prepares you to conduct original research in one of the following areas: Women in World Religions; Feminist and Ecofeminist Philosophy and Activism; and Women's Mysteries, Sacred Arts, and Healing Provides a community of engaged scholars who are taking leadership on national and global issues related to women, gender, ecology, and spirituality Your doctoral dissertation makes an original contribution to cross-disciplinary scholarship in this emergent field. Areas of Emphasis for the PhD in Philosophy and Religion with a Concentration in Women's Spirituality Women and World Religions We review a variety of ancient lineages that document women's spiritual power and religious experience from the ancient world to the present. The study of women and world religions begins with an examination of the evidence for the transmission of reverence for a dark mother of Africa to all continents of the world. We explore the sacred iconographies and roles of women in African, Native American, Meso-American, South American, Asian/Pacific Islander, old European, and other indigenous, Goddess and God spiritual traditions. We examine women's spiritual roles and practices in historical and contemporary expressions of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Shinto, and more. Canonical and orthodox religious beliefs are studied alongside the submerged, subterranean, and heretical streams that run beneath the accepted doctrines of established religions - found in the folklore, heresies, and everyday rituals of subaltern cultures. We encourage women's spiritual quests, interfaith dialogues, and the study of the Sacred Feminine or Feminine Divine of all traditions. Feminist and Ecofeminist Philosophy and Activism Feminist philosophy has long emphasized a relational approach to key philosophical issues; it encourages us to live well and to generate happiness in our own lives and the lives of others. This holistic approach eschews reductionist and mechanistic dualisms to generate a worldview of dynamic interconnectedness in the web of life. Ecofeminist philosophy explores the embodied, embedded, ecosocial context of philosophical issues, focusing attention on the emergent field of relational or holistic thought, as well as rational-intuitive thinking. Courses include work with process philosophy and process theology/theology, postcolonial womanist-feminist and indigenous worldviews, and literary responses to major ecological and philosophical issues. Women's Mysteries, Sacred Arts, and Healing Many elements of language, ritual, and the arts have roots in cultural responses to the elemental powers of the female and the ineffable mysteries of the cosmos. An honoring of women's mysteries of birth and sexuality, transformation, death and rebirth informs our coursework in ritual, music, dance, literature, painting, and film appreciation. The experiential as well as intellectual study of diverse sacred arts is intended to evoke one's innate creativity, revealing personal and cultural sources of mystical insight, embodied healing, and artistic blossoming. Apply to the Women’s Spirituality PhD The Women's Spirituality doctoral program is located at the intersection of women's/gender studies, ethnic studies, philosophy, and religion. Applicants must meet the general admission requirements of the Institute and would ideally have an MA in one of the disciplines mentioned above. For those who do not have a background in a related field, up to 18 additional units of courses drawn from the WSE curriculum will be required, minus equivalencies. (Equivalency for university courses previously taken is determined by the WSE Admissions Committee on an individual basis.) Successful candidates for admission into the Women's Spirituality doctoral program typically have the following qualifications: A vision that is compatible with the program's mission A commitment to personal and social transformation Demonstrated ability to think critically and creatively Respect for a diversity of viewpoints Sufficient maturity and stability to pursue independent inquiry The ability to clearly articulate educational, professional, and research goalsStrong scholarly writing skills The ability to identify a prospective area of specialization and/or dissertation topic that is consistent with the program's mission and resources [-]

PhD in Human Sexuality

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 USA San Francisco

This program is unique in providing an accredited doctorate degree in the interdisciplinary field of human sexuality, with concentrations in human sexuality and clinical practice, and in human sexuality policy leadership. [+]

Human Sexuality This program is unique in providing an accredited doctorate degree in the interdisciplinary field of human sexuality. Bringing together clinicians and policy leaders creates a dynamic learning environment that expands holistic sexual literacy knowledge and skills to create individual and societal change. This program is committed to clinical and policy exploration of all human beings in the most diverse and fluid spectrum of sexual and gender variations across the life course, including desires and orientations, identities, behaviors and expressions. This includes individual psychosexual development and functioning, intimate relationships, families, spirituality, and well-being, as reflected in sexual, gender and reproductive health, rights, and policies in the United States and globally. This hybrid program (partially in-person and online), designed for working professionals, begins with an intensive multiday retreat followed by weekend retreats and online work throughout the year. A small cohort is admitted annually, providing a dynamic, small-group experience. This state of the art program consists of two years of coursework, comprehensive exams, and a dissertation (4-year estimated completion). Our program offers comprehensive knowledge, clinical and policy skillsets, cutting-edge scientific research and community engagement with diverse populations. The doctorate includes a dissertation based on original research, as well as deep immersion in the clinical and/or policy realms through intensive clinical proseminars and policy traineeships. This program aims to shape the inter-professional dialogue between clinical practitioners and sexuality policy leaders in the 21st century. Fundamental to the vision of this program is the infusion of existing areas of diversity such as ethnicity, race, gender, social class, ability, and national origin. Foundational courses address theory, methodology, data analysis, and clinical and policy implications of core issues, including culture, sexual socialization, and the spectrum of sexual orientation, gender identity, sexual expression, rights and policies, and women's sexual and reproductive issues in the context of social justice. Application for Fall 2016 opens on November 15, 2015. Priority Deadline: February 1, 2016. We will continue to accept applications until all of the spaces in our programs are filled. [-]

PhD in Anthropology and Social Change

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA San Francisco

The Anthropology and Social Change is unique among graduate programs in the United States due to its focus on activist anthropology. [+]

Doctorate Degrees in Sociology in San Francisco in USA. The Anthropology and Social Change is unique among graduate programs in the United States due to its focus on activist anthropology. We believe that anthropologists should analyze, discuss, and explore the possible; that they should research alternative institutions; that they need to collectively reflect and debate the dilemmas of other possible worlds. This collective effort of understanding "real utopias" takes the form of analytic and ethnographic study of existing alternatives in the present. In a certain sense, we are a department of postcapitalist studies. However, by this complicated word, postcapitalism, we do not wish to refer to some dreamed-up utopia, nor to a speculative exploration of futuristic scenarios. While we agree with Lewis Mumford on the "importance of building castles in the sky," we see as an even more urgent necessity to study politics of alternatives in the here and now: the need to engage with postcapitalist cultures that are already being built, and to understand other worlds that are already possible. Together with the activists of the World Social Forum, we believe that "another world is possible." The role of the new social movements, we are reminded, is not to conquer the world, but to make it anew. What, then, is the role and responsibility of anthropology and other social sciences? In a world riddled with so many crises, few things appear to be more relevant than systematic research of counter-hegemonic knowledge and practices. Social scientists should leave pessimism for better times. Anthropology, in particular, is well equipped to participate in the "nowtopian" task of constructing social scientific knowledge that looks beyond capitalism, hierarchy, and ecological disaster. The practice and technique of ethnography provides an important model of a possible "postcapitalist" social science. As one contemporary anthropologist, a friend of our program, recently noted, when one "carries out an ethnography, one observes what people do, and then tries to tease out the hidden symbolic, moral, or pragmatic logics that underlie their actions; one tries to get at the way people's habits and actions make sense in ways that they are not themselves completely aware of." We ask our students to do precisely this: to look at those who are creating viable alternatives, to try to figure out what might be the larger implications of what they are already doing, and then to offer those ideas back, not as prescriptions, but as contributions, possibilities-as gifts. This program offers the space and the possibility to engage with many traditions of radical scholarship and emancipatory social science. We believe that anthropologists should analyze, discuss, and explore the possible; that they should research alternative institutions; that they need to collectively reflect and debate the dilemmas of activist anthropology. The collective effort of understanding "real utopias" takes the form of analytic and ethnographic study of real historical alternatives in the present. This, in turn, requires a serious engagement with social movements involved in the production of alternatives. Students are expected to have an excellent command of history, debates, and perspectives of contemporary social movements. These movements exist in the historical, social, and epistemological context of colonization, development, and globalization. As contributors to the book Contesting Development remind us, more then one in six humans now live in slums, over one billion in a world of jobless growth, or no growth. Solutions offered by mainstream social science are often the source of the problem, and our students are expected to have a good understanding of intertwined historical processes of colonization, development, and liberal modernity. The doctoral program is distinctive for its focus on alternatives. What are some of them? Worker cooperatives in Oakland, social centers in Italy, autonomous systems of justice in Guerrero, community gardens in Detroit, occupied self-managed factories in Argentina, "good government" of the Zapatistas, buen vivir (good life) and plurinationalism in Bolivia, participatory democracy in Kerala, solidarity economics of Mondragon, participatory economics in Winnipeg, pedagogy of the block in African-American communities, alternative environmentalism in Afro-Colombian river regions, legal pluralism, autonomy of migration, marginalized medical practices in South Asia, solidarity unionism in New York City, communal agriculture in Malawi, shack dweller democracy in South Africa, Copwatch in LA, biodiversity in Brazil, restorative justice in Ohio, knowledge commons and globalization, independent media, and autonomous food systems in Japan, are only some of the examples of postcapitalist possibilities. There are so many more, and one of the responsibilities of our students is to discover them. The program is distinctive in its emphasis on: Postcapitalist analysis of historical alternatives in the present Global social movements and lost revolutionary treasures Issues of colonialism, globalization, development Anarchist, Marxist, feminist theoretical perspectives Political ecology Integration of activism and scholarship: developing research skills in activist ethnography, intercultural translation, and emancipatory research Many classes include a research component, and the doctoral dissertation is based on activist ethnographic research. Activist ethnographic frameworks include participatory and collaborative research approaches as well as more recent research techniques and strategies associated with militant research and co-research approaches. Part-Time Curriculum Students may pursue a part-time course of study in consultation with their academic advisor. PhD Admissions Requirements Entry into the PhD program in Anthropology and Social Change requires a master's degree. Students with an MA from another school or from another department at CIIS may require up to one additional year of coursework as part of their PhD program. Students with an MA in Anthropology and Social Change from CIIS do not require additional coursework. The Anthropology and Social Change PhD concentration is a residential program. We are interested in creating a convivial community of scholars, not competitive academics; we believe in educating intellectuals and not professionals. We believe that professors and students are co-learners, and that learning, and knowledge production, is a participatory, inclusive, and horizontal process. Our program is probably not the best fit for those who want to be taught in the vertical space of a traditional classroom. Rather, this is a unique and inspiring place for activist scholars who are passionate about co-creating knowledge that is useful, relevant, and integral. Applicants must meet the general admissions requirements of the Institute. In addition, two letters of recommendation, one from an academic advisor or someone familiar with the applicant's ability to do academic work, and one from a supervisor in a recent professional or volunteer setting, are required. Applicants are also asked to include a recent sample of scholarly writing. The required autobiographical statement should describe significant events in the applicant's life that have led to the decision to pursue admission to this department. A goal statement that includes areas of academic interest should be included. Admission to the PhD Program without an MA in Anthropology from CIIS Students entering the PhD program without an MA in Anthropology and Social Change from CIIS are required to take an additional 12 to 15 units of MA-level coursework within the Anthropology and Social Change Program. Students may require an additional year in which to complete these courses. Once students are admitted, advisors will facilitate the drafting of a tailored curriculum contract that incorporates these additional courses and suggests a timeline. These additional courses include three of the following five courses: Ideas for Action: Social Theory for Radical Change Global Social Movements Unthinking Social Science Radical Theory Radical Political Economy [-]

PhD in Transformative Studies (Online Program)

California Institute of Integral Studies
Online & Campus Combined Full time 2 years September 2017 USA San Francisco

The primary focus of the doctoral program in Transformative Studies is to develop thought-leaders who are committed to exploring leading-edge issues in innovative ways that combine scholarship, creativity, and self-inquiry. [+]

Transformative Studies (Online Program) FALL ADMISSION ONLY Scholarship, Creativity, Self-Inquiry The primary focus of the doctoral program in Transformative Studies is to develop thought-leaders who are committed to exploring leading-edge issues in innovative ways that combine scholarship, creativity, and self-inquiry. The program places great value on developing the ability to participate in the scholarly discourse through publication, and on the importance of viewing academic inquiry as an opportunity for personal and social transformation, while grounding transformative processes in academic depth, rigor, and imagination. The program focuses on the development of the following capacities: Making an original transdisciplinary research contribution in a chosen area of inquiry. Engaging in inquiry as a creative and collaborative process in the context of a community of learners. Engaging inquiry as an integral, spiritual, and transformative process of personal and social transformation.Applying one’s research to real-world problems, articulating and embodying one’s values, and skillfully putting theory into practice. Program Format for the Transformative Studies Program The Transformative Studies program is offered in an online format. Students work in the online environment of the CIIS virtual classroom. During the two years of coursework, the students meet twice a year in the Bay Area for five- to seven-day residential intensives. Because intensives are an essential aspect of the learning experience, participation in the intensives is mandatory. Apply to the Transformative Studies Program This program draws diverse students-artists, attorneys, educators, ministers, social workers-who are passionate and self-directed, but who appreciate the creative questions raised by an international community of learners. Four intensive weeks spent at CIIS reinforce the strong bonds that students form online. After an experiential capstone project, our graduates pursue a variety of professions, including university and online teaching, organizational and diversity consulting, filmmaking, and international management. Admission to the Program Applicants to the Transformative Studies doctoral program must submit an autobiographical statement and two letters of recommendation, with at least one from an academic advisor or someone familiar with the applicant's ability to do advanced academic work. Applicants are also asked to provide a recent example of scholarly writing, a résumé of relevant experiences, and, of particular importance, a one- to three-page statement of how the resources of this curriculum will be used to advance a chosen inquiry. Skills and Competencies The successful applicant will have demonstrated skills and competencies in his or her field of work, which might be in such areas as education, health care, the arts, social activism, psychology, organizational development, or corporate management. Applicants should have a demonstrated capacity to learn and to work both independently and collaboratively. All students must have consistent access to a computer with the capacity to navigate the Internet and the web, and the ability to use the online medium for ongoing dialogue. This transdisciplinary program combines a sophisticated understanding of ways to structure knowledge with the ability to apply that knowledge in original research. Students experience inquiry as a transformative process, exploring multiple theoretical approaches in a variety of disciplines, and skillfully matching appropriate methods to research questions. Award-winning teacher and author Allan Combs directs the Focus in Integral Studies. [-]