Doctorate in San Francisco USA

Top PhD Programs in San Francisco USA 2017

PhD

A PhD, also known as a Doctor of Philosophy degree, is a doctorate awarded by a university to the academic who has met all necessary qualifications and can now be considered a doctor in his or her academic field.

One of the Post Graduate academic degrees that are awarded by the Universities is the Doctor of Philosophy; abbreviated as PhD. Depending on the time periods for entry-level degrees and other factors, PhD programs vary from one country to another as well as from institution to the other. With the attainment of the degree, you earn the academic title of a Doctor. The courses are available to all students who meet minimum requirements worldwide.

The United States of America is a large country in North America, often referred to as the "USA", the "US", the "United States", "America", or simply "the States". American colleges are funded by "tuition" charged to the student, which is often quite expensive, very commonly reaching into the tens of thousands of dollars per year.

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Doctoral Degrees Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (PSYD)

University of San Francisco - School of Nursing and Health Professions
Campus Full time 5 years September 2017 USA San Francisco

At the University of San Francisco, PsyD students are trained to translate thought into action, through practice-oriented training that emphasizes the mental, emotional, and physical health needs of underserved communities. [+]

At the University of San Francisco, PsyD students are trained to translate thought into action, through practice-oriented training that emphasizes the mental, emotional, and physical health needs of underserved communities.

Clinical Psychology PsyD from USF SONHP on Vimeo.

Stressing clinical practice, USF's PsyD program prepares doctoral students to work as health service psychologists in a variety of community health settings. Graduates will be proficient in the empirical and theoretical underpinnings of integrated, behavioral health interventions while sensitive to contextual, cultural, spiritual, and socioeconomic environments of individuals and communities. Licensure and Accreditation The USF PsyD Program is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) and has Associate Member status in the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology (NCSPP). Graduates of the PsyD program at USF are eligible for licensure in California (and other states) as psychologists. Program Details The USF PsyD program's mission is to offer a rigorous program of study based in Jesuit values that emphasizes clinical and scholarly work with underserved populations and focuses on training culturally responsive health service psychologists to work in interprofessional, integrated behavioral health settings. PROGRAM FEATURES & DELIVERY The program consists of four years of academic study, including three years of practica (1500-2000 hours), a professional project, and a fifth year internship (1500-2000 hours applied toward licensure), typically completed at another institution. The level of complexity and the number of hours of practica increases each year. Each practicum placement takes place in the community and includes a course on campus. Admission is in the fall only, with year-round study during fall, spring, and summer semesters. Some courses may be taken jointly with students in the Master of Science in Behavioral Health, the Master of Public Health, and the Doctor of Nursing Practice in Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner programs, and occasionally with students in other USF schools and colleges. Transfer credit may be given for courses taken at other accredited institutions that are substantially equivalent to those offered in the PsyD Program up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. Clinical Training & Research Clinical training complements academic course work and provides a wealth of experiences through which clinical competence is developed. Clinical training takes place on campus or off-campus in various community mental health settings. Second and third year clinical rotations are completed in community settings, including placement in major medical centers, community mental health agencies, university counseling centers, children's hospitals, and in-patient treatment programs. The clinical component of the program is comprehensive and includes rotations providing psychological assessment (cognitive, personality, neuropsychological testing) and treatment to children, families and adults. There are opportunities to receive generalist and specialist training in a range of diverse practicum and internship sites at nationally recognized clinical practicum sites and internships. To complete the practica requirements, students are placed in a variety of settings including major medical centers, community mental health agencies, university counseling centers, children's hospitals, and in-patient treatment programs. The practicum component of the program is comprehensive and allows students to provide psychological assessment and treatment to children, families, and adults with a focus on underserved communities. Additionally, students may gain both generalist and specialist training from a diversity of nationally recognized clinical settings in the Bay Area. Learning Outcomes Graduates of the PsyD in Clinical Psychology will acquire the knowledge, attitudes, and skills to function in diverse settings to provide culturally competent, contextually sensitive, integrated behavioral health consultation to individuals and health professionals. As a graduate of the PsyD in Clinical Psychology program, you will: Have a broad knowledge of scientific psychology; engage in evidence-based conceptualization, assessment, and treatment of human problems using individual, developmental, contextual, and sociocultural perspectives; and focus on the delivery of interprofessional, integrated healthcare with underserved populations. Have a broad scientific knowledge base and employ scientific principles to consume, produce, and disseminate psychological research, with an emphasis on underserved populations. Possess professional values and attitudes; strong communication, collaboration, and consultation abilities; and self-awareness and reflective practice skills. [-]

PhD in Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Full time 2 years September 2017 USA San Francisco

The Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness program endeavors to cultivate in its graduate students both intellectual rigor and sympathetic imaginative faculties for entering fruitfully into a multiplicity of world views, historical eras, and cultural sensibilities. [+]

The PCC program has been designed to help shape the intellectual, moral, and spiritual leadership necessary for meeting historic global challenges. Drawing upon some of the most powerful ideas and impulses of our philosophical, scientific, and religious traditions, the faculty has constructed an intensive multidisciplinary course of study to help accelerate students' journeys into their particular leadership roles within this work. Students may earn either their MA or PhD, with a track in Integral Ecology, if they choose (see below for more on the Integral Ecology track). Both the MA and the PhD programs strive to embrace the degree goals throughout the curriculum, and should be understood in the context of an overarching commitment to the cultivation of creative vitality and spiritual insight. PhD Program Goals and Student Learning Outcomes The Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness program endeavors to cultivate in its graduate students both intellectual rigor and sympathetic imaginative faculties for entering fruitfully into a multiplicity of world views, historical eras, and cultural sensibilities. By understanding transformative historical and contemporary ideas, students develop the ability to discern vibrantly creative possibilities for bringing about life-enhancing futures. The PCC PhD program encompasses all the PCC MA goals, requiring greater sophistication and nuance in scholarly work from PhD students, and adds two additional goals for PhD students. Goal 1: Global Change Agents To generate creative and effective thinking about the unprecedented evolutionary challenge of the ecological, cultural, and spiritual crisis that is currently facing the human and nonhuman members of the Earth community. Student Learning Outcome 1: Students will be able to articulate sophisticated critiques of the causes and consequences of the current global crises, reflecting an understanding of human embeddedness in the planetary community. Student Learning Outcome 2: In response to the currently dominant worldview, students will be able to generate alternatives that promote a sustainable and flourishing future for the broader Earth community. Goal 2: Sophisticated Evaluation To develop and apply appreciative and critical evaluations of major transitions in Western world views that have contributed to the current planetary situation. Student Learning Outcome 3: Students will be able to speak and write cogently about the nature of world views for a variety of scholarly and popular audiences. Student Learning Outcome 4: Students will be able to critically reflect upon the history and evolution of Western world views. Student Learning Outcome 5: Students will be able to critically engage with dominant paradigmatic elements in the history of ideas and culture, with a focus on Western world views. Goal 3: Transdisciplinarity To critique, evaluate, and apply transdisciplinary scholarship. Student Learning Outcome 6: Students will demonstrate competence in transdisciplinary thinking by integrating content and frameworks from at least two disciplines to create scholarly products. Student Learning Outcome 7: Students will be able to critically engage with research approaches from a diversity of perspectives (e.g., religious and spiritual traditions, historical, and scientific perspectives). Goal 4: Inner and outer evolution To clarify and expand the relevance of ideas studied to one’s personal life and aspirations, with an eye to their implications for the transformation of culture and society at large. Student Learning Outcome 8: Students will be able to build connections between their studies, their personal lives, and the larger communities in which they are embedded. Student Learning Outcome 9: Students will be able to tap into and express individual creativity through personal and/or scholarly communication. Goal 5: Historical knowledge To analyze the evolution of Western thought, through the ideas of major figures of Western intellectual and spiritual history, in relation to the challenges of the present moment. Student Learning Outcome 10: Students will be able to pass two comprehensive exams, one of which will demonstrate comprehension of principal ideas and themes in the development of Western thought as reflected in the PCC Guide to Important Texts (available in PCC office or on MyCIIS, www.my.ciis.edu, on the PCC Program Page). Student Learning Outcome 11: Students will be able to demonstrate familiarity with the relevant moments in the history of Western thought in the formal treatment of the dissertation topic. Goal 6: Original Contribution To produce a work of original scholarship of publishable quality that engages ideas from a transdisciplinary perspective, including a sufficient mastery in depth of at least one subject area, with an eye to the paradigmatic assumptions and implications for the transformation of culture and society at large. Student Learning Outcome 12: Students will be able to present the research and ideas that will form the basis of the dissertation in a well-organized and persuasive public lecture to the PCC community of faculty and students. Student Learning Outcome 13: Students will be able to write a dissertation that offers a substantial and original contribution to scholarship, and is certified as such by at least two PCC faculty members. Dissertation is not to exceed 250 pages. PhD Language Recommendation Ph.D. students may be required to demonstrate proficiency in one foreign language if it is deemed essential for the student’s dissertation research. Language proficiency may be demonstrated by having passed two years of course work in the study of a language, or by achieving a satisfactory score on the ETS. PhD Comprehensive Examinations The standard format consists of an annotated bibliography along with a discussion paper that forms the basis for a dialogue between the student and the supervisor. At least one of the exams must be taken with a PCC faculty member. Ideally, all other coursework must be completed (though it is possible to do one of the examinations concurrently with a last course). Each comprehensive exam must be completed in one semester. See the PCC Program Handbook for more details. The PCC general comprehensive exam consists of a 20-to-25-page essay drawing from the PCC recommended reading list and other relevant sources, situated in the context of the first and/or second of the PCC PhD learning goals. With the recommendation of the student's PCC faculty mentor and the PCC chair, a student may opt for an oral comprehensive exam as an alternative to the written exam. The second/specialized comprehensive exam prepares the student for the framing of the dissertation proposal by reviewing the literature of the student's field of interest. The exam consists of a reading list and a 20-to-25-page essay, to be followed up by a discussion with faculty. PhD Dissertation The PCC faculty direct dissertations in two broad specializations: Integral Ecology and Cosmology, and Archetypal and Consciousness Studies. After successfully completing both comprehensive exams, the student may begin working on the dissertation proposal. The dissertation proposal must be finished in three semesters; a student may petition his or her mentor in writing for an extra semester, but it should not be assumed that such an extension would be granted. If an extension is granted, the student will elect one semester of the supervised Proposal Completion Seminar (PARP 6900). Once the proposal is completed and approved by a three-person committee, the student may begin writing the dissertation proper. Throughout the dissertation writing process, the student registers for 0 (zero) units/flat fee. PhD Admissions Requirements Admission to the Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness PhD program is increasingly selective. It is independent of admission to the MA program and requires a separate admissions application. An applicant for the PhD must have done outstanding work at the MA level (see “MA Program Goals,” above). In addition, the PhD applicant must (1) identify at least one PCC core faculty member who would be appropriate to serve as a mentor in the PhD program and a second faculty member who would be able and willing to serve on the dissertation committee; (2) show close familiarity with that faculty member’s particular area of expertise; and (3) demonstrate the necessary preparation and motivation for specializing in that area (or areas), especially with respect to research leading to the dissertation. The materials required for application are an autobiography, a two-to-four-page statement of goals, a writing sample, two letters of recommendation, and transcripts. Those admitted into the doctoral concentration who do not have an MA from CIIS in Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness may be required to complete up to an additional 18 units of coursework (minus equivalencies) from the core section of the MA curriculum. [-]

PhD in Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Full time September 2017 USA San Francisco

One of the most significant recent developments is the engagement of our spiritual traditions in this transformation of consciousness and society. When the moral force of the world's religions combines with the depth understanding of ecology, humanity will find itself in the very center of that profoundly mysterious process by which the Earth Community is revitalizing itself. [+]

Doctorate Studies 2017 in San Francisco USA. A one-time $5000 scholarship is available to newly admitted students in the Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion Program for Fall 2015. We live in the midst of one of the greatest transitions in Earth's history. Humanity, having become a planetary force, is now shaping both its own future and the long-term future of millions of species of life. This decisive process occupies the most creative personalities of our time. One of the most significant recent developments is the engagement of our spiritual traditions in this transformation of consciousness and society. When the moral force of the world's religions combines with the depth understanding of ecology, humanity will find itself in the very center of that profoundly mysterious process by which the Earth Community is revitalizing itself. OUR MISSION Numerous interlocking ecological crises, including mass extinction of species, climate change, desertification, and poverty, mark the 21st century as a time of unprecedented change and challenge. This ecological devastation calls forth scientific, economic, and policy responses. Yet such standard responses often appear inadequate to the scope of the crisis. Many leading thinkers have come to understand that the ecological crisis represents a crisis of human consciousness, and requires fundamental revisioning of cultural values. The pace of global change calls for an understanding of the process by which humanity came to this crossroads in planetary history. It also calls for more enlightened ways of thinking and being in the world. The world's religious and spiritual traditions offer deep insight into the human condition, along with profound teachings about how humans should relate to one another and to Earthly life. Questions about the role and meaning of the human have illuminated religious quests for millennia; these same questions inspire the contemporary search for ecological sustainability. The concentration in Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion at CIIS is designed to help students to address these and related questions with rigor, insight, and efficacy. Taking inspiration from such visionaries as geologian Thomas Berry; His Holiness the Dalai Lama; systems theorist Joanna Macy; Nobel Laureate and Green Belt Movement founder Wangari Maathai; World Resources Institute founder Gus Speth; Forum on Religion and Ecology founders Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Grim; and many other leading thinkers, the Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion concentration invites students into an emerging discussion in which they will generate new knowledge, contributing to a growing field of academic inquiry and activism. Through the Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion concentration in the Philosophy and Religion department at CIIS, master's and doctoral students explore the role of worldviews, philosophies, and religion in understanding and responding to interconnected global ecological crises. They gain facility with ecological principles and practices. They develop the knowledge and wisdom to respond to the ecological devastation from healing integral and transdisciplinary perspectives. Students acquire skills and insight to transform practices, worldviews, and consciousness in service of a more just, sustainable, and flourishing future. The program's uniquely integrated curriculum explores such questions as: What is the role of religion, spirituality, and culture in the ecological crises of our time? What ecological insights does the world's religious heritage offer? How can explore worldviews help to understand and address ecological trauma? [-]

PhD in Asian Philosophies and Cultures

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Full time 2 years September 2017 USA San Francisco

The PhD consists of 36 semester units of coursework, plus two comprehensive examinations and a dissertation. The coursework consists of twelve units within the program, twelve units in Asian-themed electives, and twelve units in general electives. [+]

The Asian Philosophies and Cultures doctorate offers intensive study in the spiritual and philosophical traditions of South Asia, China, and the Himalayan regions, both with respect to classical and contemporary contexts. The PhD consists of 36 semester units of coursework, plus two comprehensive examinations and a dissertation. The coursework consists of twelve units within the program, twelve units in Asian-themed electives, and twelve units in general electives. Graduates of our PhD program are expected to: 1. Make an original and substantive contribution to the disciplines of Asian religion or philosophy. Think independently to develop questions, concepts, and methodologies. Identify new research opportunities within these fields. Reflect critically upon the histories, tenets, and traditions in their major field. Keep abreast of current advances within these fields and related areas. 2. Demonstrate advanced research and writing skills Synthesize existing knowledge, identifying and accessing appropriate resources and other sources of relevant information and critically analyzing and evaluating their own findings and those of others. Master application of existing research methodologies, techniques, and technical skills. Understand the range of issues in the comparative approach to religion and philosophy. Demonstrate ability to write about complex ideas and research in a professional and nuanced manner. 3. Demonstrate commitment to participation in the community of scholars. Show commitment to personal professional development through engagement in professional societies, publication, and other knowledge transfer modes. Show commitment to supporting and promoting learning through teaching, collaborative inquiry, or professional practice. 4. Demonstrate ability to situate scholarship in relationship to social and personal transformation. Situate self in relationship to work and multiple perspectives. Build upon internal passion and vision toward external career and action 5. Demonstrate professional skills. Adhere to ethical standards in the discipline and in relation to the communities studied. Listen, give, and receive feedback effectively. Communicate in a style appropriate to the discipline and setting. Appropriately use media for the dissemination of work. PhD Language Recommendation PhD students may be required to demonstrate proficiency in one foreign language if it is deemed essential for the student's dissertation research. Language proficiency may be demonstrated by having passed two years of course work in the study of a language, or additional language study depending on the dissertation topic. [-]

PhD in East-West Psychology

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Full time Part time 2 years September 2017 USA San Francisco + 1 more

The program of study consists of a foundational course, research methods courses, research colloquia, advanced seminars, a student-designed area of specialization, two comprehensive exams, and a dissertation. Students focus on a specific area of study and develop methodological skills. [+]

Doctorate Studies 2017 in San Francisco USA. Students complete 36 units of coursework and write a dissertation. The program of study consists of a foundational course, research methods courses, research colloquia, advanced seminars, a student-designed area of specialization, two comprehensive exams, and a dissertation. Students focus on a specific area of study and develop methodological skills. They work closely with their advisors to design an individualized curriculum and participate in research colloquia to articulate their dissertation research project. Ph.D. Program Learning Goals and Objectives Upon completion of the Ph.D. in East-West Psychology, and in addition to M.A. goals and objectives, graduates will be able to: Goal 1. Produce original scholarly works in the field of East-West psychology and spirituality. Objective 1. Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge and expertise in a selected area of specialization within East-West studies. Objective 2. Produce work that creatively and critically interprets, compares, integrates, applies, and/or evaluates knowledge from a variety of Eastern, Western, and indigenous psychological and spiritual traditions. Objective 3. Apply critical thinking in relation to basic and complex issues of East-West cross-cultural hermeneutics, such as orientalism, ethnocentrism, critical pluralism, insider/outsider perspectives, relativism, and/or incommensurability. Goal 2. Carry out scholarly research with a methodology appropriate to their research interests. Objective 1. Design cogent, feasible, and methodologically rigorous research projects. Objective 2. Apply several qualitative and theoretical research methods (e.g., phenomenological, hermeneutic, heuristic, narrative, comparative) to their research interests. Objective 3. Carry out a complete research project that demonstrates professional methodological knowledge and skills. Goal 3. Be competent in a variety of pedagogical, writing, and inquiry skills and be prepared to work professionally as university and college teachers, scholars, and writers. Objective 1. Present verbally their scholarly works and research projects with professionalism, clarity, precision, and creativity. Objective 2. Write original research papers and books according to professional scholarly standards. Objective 3. Incorporate somatic, vital, emotional, imaginal, and spiritual experience and knowledge into scholarly practices, such as research and writing. Dual Ph.D./Certificate Program Courses taken for the East-West Spiritual Counseling Certificate (see About Certificate) can apply toward the East-West Psychology Ph.D. requirements. By enrolling in the certificate program, a doctoral student can fulfill all the units needed in the area of specialization. Visit East-West Psychology Ph.D. Curriculum to see a Dual Ph.D./Certificate Program sample schedule. Comprehensive Examinations During the final year of coursework, doctoral students enroll in two comprehensive examinations designed to demonstrate the student’s knowledge in the program area. For their first comprehensive examination, students take an Advanced Seminar where they need to show mastery of their area of specialization in both an oral presentation and a research paper. The second comprehensive examination takes place at the last Research Colloquia taken by the student, and takes the form of a methodological reflection essay discussing the research method to be used in the dissertation. Alternative Multi-Paper Dissertation Format In addition to the standard format for doctoral dissertations, the department allows for the use of an alternative format that consists of three peer-reviewed papers (two of which must have been published or accepted for publcation; the other is to be either published, accepted for publication, or under review) as the main basis for the dissertation. Students wanting to pursue the multi-paper dissertation format are assessed by the faculty program committee on a case-by-case basis. As with the traditional dissertation, a dissertation proposal is submitted, a committee of three members is formed, and a dissertation defense is held according to existing policies. Ph.D. Full-Time Sample Schedule Duration: Two years of coursework plus dissertation. Note: Students who do not have a background in East-West psychology are required to take up to 12 additional units of courses drawn from the EWP core courses and directed electives, minus equivalencies. Sample: Emphasis on Ecopsychology/Transpersonal Psychology (plus 3 additional units from EWP core courses) Teaching Assistantships A limited number of paid teaching assistantships is available every semester. Possible responsibilities include facilitation of experiential learning, teaching portions of the class, working with students outside the classroom on projects, miscellaneous administrative and logistic tasks, providing feedback to the faculty member on student learning and perceptions, and reading student papers and giving feedback (but not as the only reader). EWP Internships An internship is an opportunity to integrate career-related experience into an academic education through on-the-job training rather than merely employment. Internships are typically a means for students to gain practical experience in their chosen field in a supervised professional work environment. The department provides students with a list of associated organizations in which internships are available: East-West Psychology Department Internship Opportunities, Internships can be carried out as fieldwork up to a maximum of 6 units. EWP Scholarship Program The department offers a scholarship program to support EWP students' presentation of their ongoing work at professional conferences. To be eligible to apply for the scholarships, candidates need to present official notification that the conference's organizing committee has accepted their presentation. Admission Applicants must meet the general admission requirements of the Institute, as well as have an MA in EWP or its equivalent (for example, a background in Humanistic, Jungian, or transpersonal psychology; psychology of religion, or religious studies). For those who do not have a background in East-West Psychology, up to 12 units of courses drawn from the EWP core requirements and directed electives will be required, minus equivalencies (equivalency for graduate courses previously taken is determined by the EWP Admissions Committee on an individual basis). In addition to the Institute's general admission requirements, two letters of recommendation are required from individuals familiar with the applicant's academic work and their preparation for graduate work. Applicants should also submit a sample of their writing (i.e., an outstanding essay, article, or selection from their M.A. thesis). Successful candidates for admission into the EWP Ph.D. program typically have the following qualifications: a vision that is compatible with the program's mission and interdisciplinary nature; a path of personal and/or spiritual growth; sufficient maturity and stability to pursue independent inquiry; competence of communication and dialectical skills; demonstration of respect for a diversity of viewpoints; an openness to multiple ways of knowing and whole-person learning; the ability to clearly articulate educational, professional, and research goals; outstanding scholarly writing skills; the ability to clearly articulate their educational and professional goals; and the capability to identify a prospective area of specialization and/or dissertation topic that is consistent with the program's mission and resources. [-]

PhD in Anthropology and Social Change

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA San Francisco

The Anthropology and Social Change is unique among graduate programs in the United States due to its focus on activist anthropology. [+]

The Anthropology and Social Change is unique among graduate programs in the United States due to its focus on activist anthropology. We believe that anthropologists should analyze, discuss, and explore the possible; that they should research alternative institutions; that they need to collectively reflect and debate the dilemmas of other possible worlds. This collective effort of understanding "real utopias" takes the form of analytic and ethnographic study of existing alternatives in the present. In a certain sense, we are a department of postcapitalist studies. However, by this complicated word, postcapitalism, we do not wish to refer to some dreamed-up utopia, nor to a speculative exploration of futuristic scenarios. While we agree with Lewis Mumford on the "importance of building castles in the sky," we see as an even more urgent necessity to study politics of alternatives in the here and now: the need to engage with postcapitalist cultures that are already being built, and to understand other worlds that are already possible. Together with the activists of the World Social Forum, we believe that "another world is possible." The role of the new social movements, we are reminded, is not to conquer the world, but to make it anew. What, then, is the role and responsibility of anthropology and other social sciences? In a world riddled with so many crises, few things appear to be more relevant than systematic research of counter-hegemonic knowledge and practices. Social scientists should leave pessimism for better times. Anthropology, in particular, is well equipped to participate in the "nowtopian" task of constructing social scientific knowledge that looks beyond capitalism, hierarchy, and ecological disaster. The practice and technique of ethnography provides an important model of a possible "postcapitalist" social science. As one contemporary anthropologist, a friend of our program, recently noted, when one "carries out an ethnography, one observes what people do, and then tries to tease out the hidden symbolic, moral, or pragmatic logics that underlie their actions; one tries to get at the way people's habits and actions make sense in ways that they are not themselves completely aware of." We ask our students to do precisely this: to look at those who are creating viable alternatives, to try to figure out what might be the larger implications of what they are already doing, and then to offer those ideas back, not as prescriptions, but as contributions, possibilities-as gifts. This program offers the space and the possibility to engage with many traditions of radical scholarship and emancipatory social science. We believe that anthropologists should analyze, discuss, and explore the possible; that they should research alternative institutions; that they need to collectively reflect and debate the dilemmas of activist anthropology. The collective effort of understanding "real utopias" takes the form of analytic and ethnographic study of real historical alternatives in the present. This, in turn, requires a serious engagement with social movements involved in the production of alternatives. Students are expected to have an excellent command of history, debates, and perspectives of contemporary social movements. These movements exist in the historical, social, and epistemological context of colonization, development, and globalization. As contributors to the book Contesting Development remind us, more then one in six humans now live in slums, over one billion in a world of jobless growth, or no growth. Solutions offered by mainstream social science are often the source of the problem, and our students are expected to have a good understanding of intertwined historical processes of colonization, development, and liberal modernity. The doctoral program is distinctive for its focus on alternatives. What are some of them? Worker cooperatives in Oakland, social centers in Italy, autonomous systems of justice in Guerrero, community gardens in Detroit, occupied self-managed factories in Argentina, "good government" of the Zapatistas, buen vivir (good life) and plurinationalism in Bolivia, participatory democracy in Kerala, solidarity economics of Mondragon, participatory economics in Winnipeg, pedagogy of the block in African-American communities, alternative environmentalism in Afro-Colombian river regions, legal pluralism, autonomy of migration, marginalized medical practices in South Asia, solidarity unionism in New York City, communal agriculture in Malawi, shack dweller democracy in South Africa, Copwatch in LA, biodiversity in Brazil, restorative justice in Ohio, knowledge commons and globalization, independent media, and autonomous food systems in Japan, are only some of the examples of postcapitalist possibilities. There are so many more, and one of the responsibilities of our students is to discover them. The program is distinctive in its emphasis on: Postcapitalist analysis of historical alternatives in the present Global social movements and lost revolutionary treasures Issues of colonialism, globalization, development Anarchist, Marxist, feminist theoretical perspectives Political ecology Integration of activism and scholarship: developing research skills in activist ethnography, intercultural translation, and emancipatory research Many classes include a research component, and the doctoral dissertation is based on activist ethnographic research. Activist ethnographic frameworks include participatory and collaborative research approaches as well as more recent research techniques and strategies associated with militant research and co-research approaches. Part-Time Curriculum Students may pursue a part-time course of study in consultation with their academic advisor. PhD Admissions Requirements Entry into the PhD program in Anthropology and Social Change requires a master's degree. Students with an MA from another school or from another department at CIIS may require up to one additional year of coursework as part of their PhD program. Students with an MA in Anthropology and Social Change from CIIS do not require additional coursework. The Anthropology and Social Change PhD concentration is a residential program. We are interested in creating a convivial community of scholars, not competitive academics; we believe in educating intellectuals and not professionals. We believe that professors and students are co-learners, and that learning, and knowledge production, is a participatory, inclusive, and horizontal process. Our program is probably not the best fit for those who want to be taught in the vertical space of a traditional classroom. Rather, this is a unique and inspiring place for activist scholars who are passionate about co-creating knowledge that is useful, relevant, and integral. Applicants must meet the general admissions requirements of the Institute. In addition, two letters of recommendation, one from an academic advisor or someone familiar with the applicant's ability to do academic work, and one from a supervisor in a recent professional or volunteer setting, are required. Applicants are also asked to include a recent sample of scholarly writing. The required autobiographical statement should describe significant events in the applicant's life that have led to the decision to pursue admission to this department. A goal statement that includes areas of academic interest should be included. Admission to the PhD Program without an MA in Anthropology from CIIS Students entering the PhD program without an MA in Anthropology and Social Change from CIIS are required to take an additional 12 to 15 units of MA-level coursework within the Anthropology and Social Change Program. Students may require an additional year in which to complete these courses. Once students are admitted, advisors will facilitate the drafting of a tailored curriculum contract that incorporates these additional courses and suggests a timeline. These additional courses include three of the following five courses: Ideas for Action: Social Theory for Radical Change Global Social Movements Unthinking Social Science Radical Theory Radical Political Economy [-]

PhD in Transformative Studies (Online Program)

California Institute of Integral Studies
Online & Campus Combined Full time 2 years September 2017 USA San Francisco

The primary focus of the doctoral program in Transformative Studies is to develop thought-leaders who are committed to exploring leading-edge issues in innovative ways that combine scholarship, creativity, and self-inquiry. [+]

Doctorate Studies 2017 in San Francisco USA. Transformative Studies (Online Program) FALL ADMISSION ONLY Scholarship, Creativity, Self-Inquiry The primary focus of the doctoral program in Transformative Studies is to develop thought-leaders who are committed to exploring leading-edge issues in innovative ways that combine scholarship, creativity, and self-inquiry. The program places great value on developing the ability to participate in the scholarly discourse through publication, and on the importance of viewing academic inquiry as an opportunity for personal and social transformation, while grounding transformative processes in academic depth, rigor, and imagination. The program focuses on the development of the following capacities: Making an original transdisciplinary research contribution in a chosen area of inquiry. Engaging in inquiry as a creative and collaborative process in the context of a community of learners. Engaging inquiry as an integral, spiritual, and transformative process of personal and social transformation.Applying one’s research to real-world problems, articulating and embodying one’s values, and skillfully putting theory into practice. Program Format for the Transformative Studies Program The Transformative Studies program is offered in an online format. Students work in the online environment of the CIIS virtual classroom. During the two years of coursework, the students meet twice a year in the Bay Area for five- to seven-day residential intensives. Because intensives are an essential aspect of the learning experience, participation in the intensives is mandatory. Apply to the Transformative Studies Program This program draws diverse students-artists, attorneys, educators, ministers, social workers-who are passionate and self-directed, but who appreciate the creative questions raised by an international community of learners. Four intensive weeks spent at CIIS reinforce the strong bonds that students form online. After an experiential capstone project, our graduates pursue a variety of professions, including university and online teaching, organizational and diversity consulting, filmmaking, and international management. Admission to the Program Applicants to the Transformative Studies doctoral program must submit an autobiographical statement and two letters of recommendation, with at least one from an academic advisor or someone familiar with the applicant's ability to do advanced academic work. Applicants are also asked to provide a recent example of scholarly writing, a résumé of relevant experiences, and, of particular importance, a one- to three-page statement of how the resources of this curriculum will be used to advance a chosen inquiry. Skills and Competencies The successful applicant will have demonstrated skills and competencies in his or her field of work, which might be in such areas as education, health care, the arts, social activism, psychology, organizational development, or corporate management. Applicants should have a demonstrated capacity to learn and to work both independently and collaboratively. All students must have consistent access to a computer with the capacity to navigate the Internet and the web, and the ability to use the online medium for ongoing dialogue. This transdisciplinary program combines a sophisticated understanding of ways to structure knowledge with the ability to apply that knowledge in original research. Students experience inquiry as a transformative process, exploring multiple theoretical approaches in a variety of disciplines, and skillfully matching appropriate methods to research questions. Award-winning teacher and author Allan Combs directs the Focus in Integral Studies. [-]

PhD in Women’s Spirituality

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Full time September 2017 USA San Francisco

The Women's Spirituality program is located at the intersection of Women/Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies, Philosophy, and Religion. Our program honors the spiritual impulse to redress the suppression of the sacred feminine and the oppression of women. [+]

PhD in Philosophy and Religion with Concentration in Women's Spirituality The Women's Spirituality program is located at the intersection of Women/Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies, Philosophy, and Religion. Our program honors the spiritual impulse to redress the suppression of the sacred feminine and the oppression of women. We join with those who seek to end the exploitation of marginalized social groups and address the suffering of the Earth and its many species. Our faculty is internationally known and includes many pioneers in the interdisciplinary field of Women’s Spirituality. Overview Founded by internationally known trailblazers in the women's spirituality movement, this doctoral program is located at the intersection of women/gender studies, ethnic studies, religious studies, and philosophy. Through evening and weekend classes, online courses, and a semi-distance option, the program offers you a flexible format that allows you to integrate your studies with your professional and/or family life. Our PhD program: Offers you rigorous academic training that is grounded in transdisciplinary, spiritual, and feminist methodologies Prepares you to conduct original research in one of the following areas: Women in World Religions; Feminist and Ecofeminist Philosophy and Activism; and Women's Mysteries, Sacred Arts, and Healing Provides a community of engaged scholars who are taking leadership on national and global issues related to women, gender, ecology, and spirituality Your doctoral dissertation makes an original contribution to cross-disciplinary scholarship in this emergent field. Areas of Emphasis for the PhD in Philosophy and Religion with a Concentration in Women's Spirituality Women and World Religions We review a variety of ancient lineages that document women's spiritual power and religious experience from the ancient world to the present. The study of women and world religions begins with an examination of the evidence for the transmission of reverence for a dark mother of Africa to all continents of the world. We explore the sacred iconographies and roles of women in African, Native American, Meso-American, South American, Asian/Pacific Islander, old European, and other indigenous, Goddess and God spiritual traditions. We examine women's spiritual roles and practices in historical and contemporary expressions of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Shinto, and more. Canonical and orthodox religious beliefs are studied alongside the submerged, subterranean, and heretical streams that run beneath the accepted doctrines of established religions - found in the folklore, heresies, and everyday rituals of subaltern cultures. We encourage women's spiritual quests, interfaith dialogues, and the study of the Sacred Feminine or Feminine Divine of all traditions. Feminist and Ecofeminist Philosophy and Activism Feminist philosophy has long emphasized a relational approach to key philosophical issues; it encourages us to live well and to generate happiness in our own lives and the lives of others. This holistic approach eschews reductionist and mechanistic dualisms to generate a worldview of dynamic interconnectedness in the web of life. Ecofeminist philosophy explores the embodied, embedded, ecosocial context of philosophical issues, focusing attention on the emergent field of relational or holistic thought, as well as rational-intuitive thinking. Courses include work with process philosophy and process theology/theology, postcolonial womanist-feminist and indigenous worldviews, and literary responses to major ecological and philosophical issues. Women's Mysteries, Sacred Arts, and Healing Many elements of language, ritual, and the arts have roots in cultural responses to the elemental powers of the female and the ineffable mysteries of the cosmos. An honoring of women's mysteries of birth and sexuality, transformation, death and rebirth informs our coursework in ritual, music, dance, literature, painting, and film appreciation. The experiential as well as intellectual study of diverse sacred arts is intended to evoke one's innate creativity, revealing personal and cultural sources of mystical insight, embodied healing, and artistic blossoming. Apply to the Women’s Spirituality PhD The Women's Spirituality doctoral program is located at the intersection of women's/gender studies, ethnic studies, philosophy, and religion. Applicants must meet the general admission requirements of the Institute and would ideally have an MA in one of the disciplines mentioned above. For those who do not have a background in a related field, up to 18 additional units of courses drawn from the WSE curriculum will be required, minus equivalencies. (Equivalency for university courses previously taken is determined by the WSE Admissions Committee on an individual basis.) Successful candidates for admission into the Women's Spirituality doctoral program typically have the following qualifications: A vision that is compatible with the program's mission A commitment to personal and social transformation Demonstrated ability to think critically and creatively Respect for a diversity of viewpoints Sufficient maturity and stability to pursue independent inquiry The ability to clearly articulate educational, professional, and research goalsStrong scholarly writing skills The ability to identify a prospective area of specialization and/or dissertation topic that is consistent with the program's mission and resources [-]

PhD in Integral and Transpersonal Psychology

California Institute of Integral Studies
Online & Campus Combined Full time September 2017 USA San Francisco

Transpersonal psychology is a transformative psychology of the whole person in intimate relationship with a diverse, interconnected, and evolving world. [+]

Doctorate Studies 2017 in San Francisco USA. PhD in Integral and Transpersonal Psychology Transpersonal psychology is a transformative psychology of the whole person in intimate relationship with a diverse, interconnected, and evolving world. It pays particular attention to states of consciousness associated with spiritual, mystical, and other exceptional human experiences that seem to promote healing, transformation, and connection to the larger world. As a psychology situated in community and world, transpersonal affirms the value of social action and ecological stewardship. Because our relationships are global, a transpersonal approach challenges the false norms of a psychology that is situated in any one meaning frame. Transpersonal’s initial mission to include more than one valid state of consciousness can now be extended to embrace many ways of being human as reflected in culture, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, spiritual path, and ways of knowing. The integral vision of a whole-person psychology can blossom into a psychology of humanity that celebrates our differences as much as it honors what we hold in common. The notion that spirituality is an aspect if the human being apart from any specific religion is an idea that comes directly from transpersonal psychology, and it was the first field to examine the practices of Eastern spirituality, such as mindfulness, from a psychological perspective. Transpersonal was also the first psychology to study psychedelics, a field that is now coming back to the attention of mainstream researchers. As an outgrowth of humanistic psychology, it is part of the movement that almost single-handedly invented the field of personal growth and development. As a whole-person psychology, it resonates with the values and perspectives of the complementary and alternative medicine movement, which has become a major force in healthcare. Integral psychology is concerned with exploring and understanding the totality of human consciousness and personality. It seeks to unify the personal, interpersonal, and transpersonal dimensions of human experience to achieve wholeness of personality, multicultural harmony, and collective transformation. Integral psychology was first developed by Indra Sen based on the practical and transformative aspects of Sri Aurobindo’s integral yoga psychology. Later formulations of integral psychology were offered by CIIS founder Dr. Haridas Chaudhuri, who developed his own unique approach, and others including Brant Cortright, who has developed a synthesis of Sri Aurobindo’s thought with the three major streams of Western psychology—behavioral, psychoanalytic, and humanistic-existential—in the context of integral psychotherapy. Career Outcomes There are three main groups of students for whom this degree is well suited. One such group is those with an existing profession who wish to advance their education and contribute to the development of better research and scholarship in their professional areas of work, such as psychotherapists, social workers, psychologists, counselors, consultants, activists, organizers, leaders, teachers, researchers, nurses, physicians, lawyers, or others in fields related to personal development, social change, or environmental protection. Another group consists of individuals who are entrepreneurially oriented, and who may wish to use their degree as the basis for consulting or writing and teaching in the public arena about their area of expertise. In addition, some students wish to pursue a PhD as a means to more fully developing their personal gifts and potentials. Apply to the PhD in Integral and Transpersonal Psychology Applicants must have a master's degree from a regionally-accredited institution either in an area of the humanities such as psychology, sociology, anthropology, or education, or in a field that is directly related to their proposed area of dissertation study. [-]

PhD in Human Sexuality

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 USA San Francisco

This program is unique in providing an accredited doctorate degree in the interdisciplinary field of human sexuality, with concentrations in human sexuality and clinical practice, and in human sexuality policy leadership. [+]

Human Sexuality This program is unique in providing an accredited doctorate degree in the interdisciplinary field of human sexuality. Bringing together clinicians and policy leaders creates a dynamic learning environment that expands holistic sexual literacy knowledge and skills to create individual and societal change. This program is committed to clinical and policy exploration of all human beings in the most diverse and fluid spectrum of sexual and gender variations across the life course, including desires and orientations, identities, behaviors and expressions. This includes individual psychosexual development and functioning, intimate relationships, families, spirituality, and well-being, as reflected in sexual, gender and reproductive health, rights, and policies in the United States and globally. This hybrid program (partially in-person and online), designed for working professionals, begins with an intensive multiday retreat followed by weekend retreats and online work throughout the year. A small cohort is admitted annually, providing a dynamic, small-group experience. This state of the art program consists of two years of coursework, comprehensive exams, and a dissertation (4-year estimated completion). Our program offers comprehensive knowledge, clinical and policy skillsets, cutting-edge scientific research and community engagement with diverse populations. The doctorate includes a dissertation based on original research, as well as deep immersion in the clinical and/or policy realms through intensive clinical proseminars and policy traineeships. This program aims to shape the inter-professional dialogue between clinical practitioners and sexuality policy leaders in the 21st century. Fundamental to the vision of this program is the infusion of existing areas of diversity such as ethnicity, race, gender, social class, ability, and national origin. Foundational courses address theory, methodology, data analysis, and clinical and policy implications of core issues, including culture, sexual socialization, and the spectrum of sexual orientation, gender identity, sexual expression, rights and policies, and women's sexual and reproductive issues in the context of social justice. Application for Fall 2016 opens on November 15, 2015. Priority Deadline: February 1, 2016. We will continue to accept applications until all of the spaces in our programs are filled. [-]

Clinical Psychology (PsyD) Program at CIIS

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Full time Part time 3 - 4 years September 2017 USA San Francisco + 1 more

The PsyD Program at CIIS is unique. Located in the heart of San Francisco, ours was the first accredited university in North America to offer programs that connect the insights of Western psychology with Eastern spirituality. [+]

Doctorate Studies 2017 in San Francisco USA. The Clinical Psychology (PsyD) Program at CIIS The PsyD Program at CIIS is unique. Located in the heart of San Francisco, ours was the first accredited university in North America to offer programs that connect the insights of Western psychology with Eastern spirituality. We continue today to present a dynamic clinical psychology curriculum that combines the latest scientific research with the world's great wisdom traditions. We believe that such a synthesis permits deep understanding of the human condition, as well as insight into the most effective ways of helping those in need. The PsyD Program is carefully designed to prepare students for practice-focused careers in clinical psychology. As a member of the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology (NCSPP), our practitioner-scholar training model provides broad and general education in clinical psychology that, in addition, integrates depth-psychological, societal, ecological, and spiritual dimensions of human experience into the curriculum. Full time students who enter the program with Regular Standing (those who enter with a BA) typically take three to four years to complete coursework. This is followed by the internship, which takes one year if it is a full-time internship (about forty hours a week), two years if it is a part-time internship (about twenty hours a week). The dissertation also follows coursework and, while it is possible to complete the dissertation in one year, students typically take two years to complete and write up their research. Realistically, a full time student admitted with Regular standing can expect to complete the degree in five to seven years, depending on their choice of internship and the nature of their dissertation project. Advanced - standing students (those who enter with a Master's degree in Psychology, or the equivalent) have the option of completing the program in four years, with three years of reduced-load coursework and concurrent dissertation work, followed by one year of internship. The majority of Advanced Standing students take four and a half to five years to complete the degree Our distinctive approach to clinical psychology training is guided by a vision of clinical practice that emphasizes a holistic and relational approach to the human condition. We teach students the value of open inquiry into self and other. At the center of this inquiry is the whole person who exists in relationship with other persons, with communities, with cultural meaning systems, and with nature. We believe that psychological suffering often has to do with the fracturing of these crucial relationships. Consistent with the visionary CIIS mission, we view the educational process itself as holistic and relational, and we aspire to “walk our talk” as a learning community – one that is creative and transformative on both personal and professional levels. Our course offerings reflect the broad-minded, integrative perspective pioneered at CIIS decades ago. Alan Watts, a leading figure in the transmission of Eastern spirituality to the West, described the American Academy of Asian Studies (which later became CIIS) as “one of the principal roots of what later came to be known, in the early sixties, as the San Francisco Renaissance." During that time, the Bay Area became synonymous with new currents in psychology that continue to transform the field. Like CIIS’s founders, our faculty and students continue to work at psychology’s cutting edge, in its deepest traditions, and toward the project of realizing our most profound human potentials. CIIS is fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WASC-SASC). The PsyD Program is a member of the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology (NCSPP). Graduates of the PsyD program at CIIS are eligible for licensure as psychologists in California and many other states. The San Francisco Bay Area is at the forefront of change in psychology, especially at CIIS. We welcome you to come visit us and learn more about the CIIS/Bay Area psychology experience. Clinical Psychology (PsyD) Program Licensure Graduates of the PsyD program at CIIS are eligible for licensure as psychologists in California and many other states. In fact, over the last five years, according to the EPPP published data, CIIS students scored higher on the national examination than graduates of any APA approved PsyD program in the Bay Area. Apply to the Clinical Psychology (PsyD) Program Emphasizing preparation for clinical practice this program combines rigorous scholarship, supervised clinical experience and practica and internships. PsyD students fulfill a diversity and identity competency requirement by taking three courses connecting clinical practice with culture and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and religion and spirituality. For field experience students can apply to over 90 community agencies, serving a diverse mix of clients. Additionally, they have access to the Institute's exciting array of public programs. Our training philosophy comprises four components: learning in a multicultural context, which integrates practica and classroom work a relational model of learning and training significant reflection on one's clinical practice broad range of scholarship Admission Requirements Admission Application Non-refundable $65 Application Fee Degree Requirement: An undergraduate degree (BA, BS, or the equivalent) from an accredited college or university in Psychology or 12 semester units/18 quarter units of Psychology course work Academic Prerequisites: 12 semester units/18 quarter units of Psychology course work including a Statistics course. Transcripts: Official transcripts from all accredited academic institutions attended within the United States. Transcripts must arrive in their official, sealed envelopes. Minimum GPA of 3.0 at the undergraduate degree-granting institution - for final 60 semester units or 90 quarter units of course work. Academic Writing Sample: A writing sample of eight to ten pages (typed, double-spaced) that demonstrates your capacity to think critically and reflectively and demonstrates graduate level writing abilities. A sample that uses outside sources must include proper citations. You may submit copies of previous work, such as a recent academic paper, article, or report that reflects scholarly abilities. Two Letters of Recommendation: Letters of recommendation will be accepted from academic advisors, professors, professional supervisors, or someone able to attest to your maturity, motivation, and ability to undertake the work required for the PsyD Program. Recommenders should use standard business format and include full contact information-name, email, phone number, and mailing address. Goal Statement: A one-page (typed, double-spaced) statement of your educational and professional objectives. Autobiographical Statement: A four-to-six page (typed, double-spaced) self-reflective, lifespan autobiographical statement discussing your values, emotional and spiritual insights, aspirations, and life experiences that have led to the decision to apply to the PsyD program. International students and individuals who have studied at institutions outside the US and Canada may have additional requirements. Advanced Standing A limited number of Advanced Standing students who have completed an MA or MS degree in psychology (or equivalent) with a GPA of 3.25 and completed 500 practicum hours may be admitted each year. Advanced Standing students complete a reduced number of units in a program that is designed on a case by case basis depending on prior graduate coursework. Students admitted with Advanced Standing must complete all required courses at CIIS or demonstrate prior completion through submission and review of syllabi from prior coursework. Spring Admission into the Psychology Doctoral Program Once accepted into the PsyD program, a limited number of students have the option to enroll in some courses for the spring or summer semester before their Fall semester begins. With the approval of the PsyD department, students can enroll in selected courses prior to commencement of the fall semester, later to join the fall cohort. Students who employ this option reduce the number of courses required during their first and/or second years of study. This option may provide greater latitude to curriculum planning for individual students. Students who begin to take classes in the spring or summer semesters are considered members of the student cohort that officially begins in the fall semester of the year that they are admitted and will move through the practicum sequence with that cohort. [-]

Special Education (Ed.D.)

University of San Francisco - School of Education
Campus Full time Part time 5 years August 2017 USA San Francisco + 1 more

With a focus on equity, access, and inclusion, the Ed.D. in Special Education prepares students for research, leadership, and higher education teaching. [+]

Disability. Equity. Culture. With a focus on equity, access, and inclusion, the Ed.D. in Special Education prepares students for research, leadership, and higher education teaching. Our interdisciplinary approach, allows students to draw from, critique, and contribute various perspectives on disability and its intersection with other social markers — to advocate for, and walk in solidarity with people with disabilities. Program coursework provides a strong methodological and theoretical foundation, and prepares students for three practicum experiences: higher education teaching, research, and school consultation and collaboration, providing opportunities for career advancement. In each practicum, students are matched with a faculty mentor from USF or another university and given the opportunity to take part in a research study, teach a graduate level course, or collaborate with a community-based organization. Program Details The doctoral program consists of 60 credit hours of study beyond the master's degree and culminates in the completion of a doctoral dissertation. By taking 12-15 credits per year, students can complete the doctoral program in five years. Upon completion of the program, graduates will be able to conduct meaningful research related to the issues and challenges faced by students with disabilities, provide evidence-based teacher education, and collaborate with school personnel to improve the educational outcomes of students with disabilities. They will be able to consider and address a variety of cultural, linguistic, socioeconomic, contextual, and communicative factors as they prepare future K-12 special education teachers to serve students with disabilities. Program Delivery To meet the needs of working professionals, the program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester (Friday evenings and all day Saturdays). Course Details Students can complete the Ed.D. in Special Education program in five years or less depending upon how many courses are taken in a semester. Learning Outcomes The Doctoral Program in Special Education Student Learning Outcomes: The faculty in the Doctoral Program in Special Education will provide students with foundational-level skills for scholarship in learning and instruction. Students will demonstrate an understanding of data-analysis skills. Students will demonstrate scholarly analysis of research articles. Students will demonstrate scholarly writing. The faculty in the Doctoral Program in Special Education will provide students with advanced-level skills for scholarship in learning and instruction. Students will demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate standardized assessment instruments of their own choosing. Students will demonstrate the ability to write results sections of research studies. Students will demonstrate the ability to apply literature review techniques to a subject of their own choosing. The faculty in the Doctoral Program in Special Education will provide students with the ability to design, conduct, and communicate original research of their own choosing. Students will communicate original research Students will design, conduct, and write up original research of their own choosing. Visit our website here to learn more about this program Financial Resources Federal financial aid, state, and university resources are available as funding to newly admitted and current USF School of Education students. In order to offset the cost of graduate education tuition, many School of Education courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening, and/or on alternating weekends. Most students find they can maintain a full time job while earning their credential, master’s or doctoral degree. However, if your program requires you to spend time in a classroom (i.e. student teaching) or to complete a fieldwork or traineeship experience, such commitments will interfere with a normal workday.     Visit our website to learn more about financial resources for this program [-]

Organization and Leadership (Ed.D.)

University of San Francisco - School of Education
Campus Full time Part time 5 years August 2017 USA San Francisco + 1 more

The Doctorate of Education (Ed.D.) in Organization and Leadership is a unique program for working professionals who see themselves as educational leaders transforming their organizations through a learning perspective. [+]

Doctorate Studies 2017 in San Francisco USA. Preparing leaders who serve schools, community and social agencies, government, and non-profit institutions in a regional and international world. The Doctorate of Education (Ed.D.) in Organization and Leadership is a unique program for working professionals who see themselves as educational leaders transforming their organizations through a learning perspective. Program Details The Organization and Leadership (O&L) Doctoral program is comprised of 60 credits of study beyond the master's degree and culminates in the completion of a doctoral dissertation. Program Delivery To meet the needs of working professionals, the program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester (Friday evenings and all day Saturdays). “The size and structure of the program were appealing to me, a working professional and parent, and I was intrigued by the opportunities that existed to form strong bonds and work closely with my peers and instructors. I can confidently say that my greatest expectations were fulfilled. I had the opportunity to travel abroad, participate in experiential learning, establish close relationships, and work with dedicated and phenomenally talented professors and incredibly motivated scholars.” - Demerris R. Brooks-Immel, O&L Ed.D. Alumna Learning Outcomes The Organization and Leadership Program Learning Outcomes: The program brings before students a continuum of new knowledge and understanding that reflects current theories, research, and innovative practices. The program equips students to apply the principles of leadership theory in a broad range of settings to effectively lead individuals and organizations to success. The program equips students to select, implement, and manage appropriate leadership methodologies to meet individual, group, and organizational needs in K-12 through higher education, for-profit, and nonprofit settings. The program equips students to utilize and conduct research to evaluate and improve organizational processes. Create leaders who are able to critically examine organizations in order to promote equitable outcomes. Foster advocacy for social justice with a consciousness around the experiences and challenges facing historically underrepresented groups. Understand and apply research to problems of practice. Develop leaders who are self-reflective of their practice and its implications for social justice and equity. The Organizational and Leadership Program Student Learning Outcomes: Graduates will have acquired the knowledge, understanding, tools and skills necessary to assume leadership roles in organizations at the local, state, national and international levels. Graduates will have an understanding of research methods and demonstrate competencies to engage in rigorous scholarship. Graduates will be able to relate theory to practice and demonstrate synthesis of advanced knowledge by improving organizations. Graduates will have adopted habits of personal and scholarly reflections that examine professional practice and lead to systemic renewal. Careers Graduates of the O&L doctoral program are educators who work in leadership, management, research, and all levels of teaching in the fields of education, business, health, government, consulting, and profit and non-profit settings. EXAMPLES OF CAREER OPTIONS INCLUDE: Higher Education Administration University Professor Management Consultant Applied Researcher Principal Superintendent Financial Resources Federal financial aid, state, and university resources are available as funding to newly admitted and current USF School of Education students. In order to offset the cost of graduate education tuition, many School of Education courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening, and/or on alternating weekends. Most students find they can maintain a full time job while earning their credential, master’s or doctoral degree. However, if your program requires you to spend time in a classroom (i.e. student teaching) or to complete a fieldwork or traineeship experience, such commitments will interfere with a normal workday.     Visit our website to learn more about financial resources for this program Visit our website here to learn more about this program [-]

International and Multicultural Education (Ed.D.)

University of San Francisco - School of Education
Campus Full time Part time 5 years August 2017 USA San Francisco + 1 more

The <strong>Ed.D. in International and Multicultural Education (IME)</strong> is dedicated to understanding formal and informal education within diverse sociocultural, linguistic, political and economic contexts. [+]

Training Critical Scholars and Engaged Practitioners The Ed.D. in International and Multicultural Education (IME) is dedicated to understanding formal and informal education within diverse sociocultural, linguistic, political and economic contexts. Based on principles of equity, social justice, and human rights, the program critically addresses the realities of education within and beyond the borders of public schooling in the United States and around the world. Our program equips students with the skills needed to engage in scholarship, teaching and advocacy work that addresses many of the key issues impacting education today. Visit our website here to learn more about this program Distinctive Program Features Focus on engaged scholarship with a meaningful impact on local and global communities. A cutting edge and intellectually rigorous curriculum grounded in critical pedagogy. A strong sense of community composed of highly diverse faculty and students who offer personal and scholarly support. Apprenticeship opportunities for doctoral students in becoming social justice scholars, practitioners, and advocates. "IME is a family, a group of intelligent loving human beings that feel that social justice is at the core of being an educator. It is a place that is called our second home, a place that we come to when the outside world is frustrating and we need a place of support and reflection. It is this place that thoughts are thrown around honored, respected and gracefully challenged. It is the place that has been present in civilizations since the beginning of time...community." —IME EdD Student Program Delivery The program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester (Friday evenings and all day Saturdays). Program Details The Ed.D. program is grounded in five main conceptual areas: critical social theory and schooling; intersectionality of race, class, nation, language, gender and sexuality in education; human rights and social movements; international and comparative education; and alternative research paradigms. Rooted in the practice of critical pedagogy, this program provides a dynamic learning community where students benefit from rigorous experience both in the classroom and in the community. We believe that IME’s conceptual framework and pedagogy serve to equip students in becoming leaders capable of reimagining possibilities for education in multiple contexts. The International and Multicultural Education (IME) Doctoral Program is comprised of 60 credits of study beyond the master's degree and culminates in the completion of a doctoral dissertation. Students can choose from a range of courses in IME or concentration in either Human Rights Education or Second Language Acquisition. Learning Outcomes The International and Multicultural Education Program Learning Outcomes The goal of each IME program is to develop professional practitioners with expertise in three key areas: Conceptual and Theoretical knowledge: including critical social theory, critical pedagogy, critical race theory and intersectionality, feminist theory, human rights and social movements, and alternative research paradigms. Application skills: analysis, synthesis, and evaluation skills for teaching and research, program/policy development and administration, and local/global social justice/human rights activism. Methodological tools based in qualitative research such as participatory action research, teacher action research, testimonio, and critical ethnography. The International and Multicultural Education Program Student Learning Outcomes The IME programs are designed to enable students upon graduation, to: Use theory as a lens for thinking critically about social inequities in local/global contexts. Work as a transformative professional in schools, universities, and communities to bring about social change. Be a prominent voice in the educational justice movement through scholarship and praxis Design, implement, and assess K-12 and post-secondary classroom/community programs focused on human rights, social justice, and/or critical multicultural education. Financial Resources Federal financial aid, state, and university resources are available as funding to newly admitted and current USF School of Education students. In order to offset the cost of graduate education tuition, many School of Education courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening, and/or on alternating weekends. Most students find they can maintain a full time job while earning their credential, master’s or doctoral degree. However, if your program requires you to spend time in a classroom (i.e. student teaching) or to complete a fieldwork or traineeship experience, such commitments will interfere with a normal workday. Visit our website to learn more about financial resources for this program. Careers Graduates of the IME Doctoral Program work as transformative professionals in a variety of settings both in the U.S. and internationally, such as: CAREER OPTIONS Faculty members at community colleges and universities Teacher leaders in K-12 schools School superintendents Educational researchers Leaders in community and non-governmental organizations Curriculum specialists GRADUATES OF THE IME DOCTORAL PROGRAM Professor and Chair, Urban Education, Loyola Marymount University Professor and Chair, Elementary Education, San Francisco State University Professor, Bilingual and Multicultural Education, California State University, Sacramento Assistant Professor, Reading, Texas Woman's University Faculty, Santa Rosa Junior College and Solano Community College Lecturer, American Studies, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary Director, Bilingual Education, Professional Development and Special Programs, San Jose Unified School District Teacher trainers for international organizations [-]

Learning and Instruction (Ed.D.)

University of San Francisco - School of Education
Campus Full time 5 years August 2017 USA San Francisco

Applying Research and Educational Psychology to Diverse Learning Environments [+]

Doctorate Studies 2017 in San Francisco USA. The Learning and Instruction Department offers exciting and unique programs at the doctoral level. Learning and instruction is the application of psychological principles and concepts to solve problems in educational and training settings. Individual differences, cognitive and social development, learning and motivational theory, instructional design, classroom teaching and management, and assessment are common topics addressed in the program. Learning and Instruction Doctoral Program (Ed.D.) Applying research and educational psychology to diverse learning environments. Visit our website here to learn more about this program The program provides working professionals with the research skills and core content to make use of and contribute to the knowledge base in learning and instruction. Using the latest technology to assist in instructional delivery and support, coursework focuses on learners and learning, instructional settings, research skills, and special education. There is also an option to obtain a Concentration in Special Education or a Concentration in Digital Technology for Teaching and Learning (nine credits). "I think the first thing one notices when attending USF is a sense of community. Professors are truly interested in every student's learning, which translates into a program that includes rigor and caring. Small class sizes—check, knowledgeable professors—check, a learning environment that promotes global thinking—check. In my opinion, USF has it all!." —KAREN SANFORD, Student EdD Entry Requirements - Completed online application with non-refundable $55 application fee. - One set of unofficial transcripts from each university/college previously attended. For U.S. applicants, the degree must be from a regionally accredited university/college. An applicant with a pending degree must provide official verification of expected degree completion from institution's Registrar or school official. An undergraduate degree is required to apply to a master's program. A master's degree is required to apply for a doctoral program. Please note: if admitted you will need to submit official transcripts prior to enrolling. - MA and Credential applicants: Minimum GPA of 2.75 - Doctoral applicants: Minimum GPA of 3.0 from a graduate program - Two current, signed letters of recommendation, noting suitability for graduate work. - Current résumé. - A Statement of Intent Doctoral applicants must also submit: - MA thesis (excerpt or complete copy) or graduate level paper. - Official scores for either the Graduate Record Examinations or Miller Analogies Test (MAT). Test scores must be sent directly to USF by the Education Testing Service (GRE) or the Psychological Corporation (MAT). No photocopies of the results will be accepted. Scores must have been obtained within the past five years. Financial Resources Federal financial aid, state, and university resources are available as funding to newly admitted and current USF School of Education students. In order to offset the cost of graduate education tuition, many School of Education courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening, and/or on alternating weekends. Most students find they can maintain a full time job while earning their credential, master’s or doctoral degree. However, if your program requires you to spend time in a classroom (i.e. student teaching) or to complete a fieldwork or traineeship experience, such commitments will interfere with a normal workday. Visit our website to learn more about financial resources for this program [-]