Doctorate Degrees in Anthropology

Compare 19 PhD Programs in Anthropology

Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of humanity that combines the natural and social sciences. The sub-fields of anthropology include cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and archeology.

There are many universities that offer PhD Anthropology programs with many research concentrations. A PhD Anthropology program usually consists of coursework, research that is conducted outside of the candidate's geographical area, and a dissertation. Examples of topics of study for PhD Anthropology are urban anthropology, culture and cognition, historic and public archeology, anthropology of development, and ethnicity. Graduates with a PhD Anthropology degree often become professors in universities, or take positions in research institutes, non-profit organizations, government agencies, and private companies.

If you are interested in a PhD Anthropology degree, then scroll through the options below and find the education you have been searching for!

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International and Multicultural Education (Ed.D.)

University of San Francisco - School of Education
Campus Full time Part time 5 years August 2017 USA San Francisco + 1 more

The Ed.D. in International and Multicultural Education (IME) is dedicated to understanding formal and informal education within diverse sociocultural, linguistic, political and economic contexts. [+]

PhDs in Anthropology. Training Critical Scholars and Engaged Practitioners The Ed.D. in International and Multicultural Education (IME) is dedicated to understanding formal and informal education within diverse sociocultural, linguistic, political and economic contexts. Based on principles of equity, social justice, and human rights, the program critically addresses the realities of education within and beyond the borders of public schooling in the United States and around the world. Our program equips students with the skills needed to engage in scholarship, teaching and advocacy work that addresses many of the key issues impacting education today. Visit our website here to learn more about this program Distinctive Program Features Focus on engaged scholarship with a meaningful impact on local and global communities. A cutting edge and intellectually rigorous curriculum grounded in critical pedagogy. A strong sense of community composed of highly diverse faculty and students who offer personal and scholarly support. Apprenticeship opportunities for doctoral students in becoming social justice scholars, practitioners, and advocates. "IME is a family, a group of intelligent loving human beings that feel that social justice is at the core of being an educator. It is a place that is called our second home, a place that we come to when the outside world is frustrating and we need a place of support and reflection. It is this place that thoughts are thrown around honored, respected and gracefully challenged. It is the place that has been present in civilizations since the beginning of time...community." —IME EdD Student Program Delivery The program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester (Friday evenings and all day Saturdays). Program Details The Ed.D. program is grounded in five main conceptual areas: critical social theory and schooling; intersectionality of race, class, nation, language, gender and sexuality in education; human rights and social movements; international and comparative education; and alternative research paradigms. Rooted in the practice of critical pedagogy, this program provides a dynamic learning community where students benefit from rigorous experience both in the classroom and in the community. We believe that IME’s conceptual framework and pedagogy serve to equip students in becoming leaders capable of reimagining possibilities for education in multiple contexts. The International and Multicultural Education (IME) Doctoral Program is comprised of 60 credits of study beyond the master's degree and culminates in the completion of a doctoral dissertation. Students can choose from a range of courses in IME or concentration in either Human Rights Education or Second Language Acquisition. Learning Outcomes The International and Multicultural Education Program Learning Outcomes The goal of each IME program is to develop professional practitioners with expertise in three key areas: Conceptual and Theoretical knowledge: including critical social theory, critical pedagogy, critical race theory and intersectionality, feminist theory, human rights and social movements, and alternative research paradigms. Application skills: analysis, synthesis, and evaluation skills for teaching and research, program/policy development and administration, and local/global social justice/human rights activism. Methodological tools based in qualitative research such as participatory action research, teacher action research, testimonio, and critical ethnography. The International and Multicultural Education Program Student Learning Outcomes The IME programs are designed to enable students upon graduation, to: Use theory as a lens for thinking critically about social inequities in local/global contexts. Work as a transformative professional in schools, universities, and communities to bring about social change. Be a prominent voice in the educational justice movement through scholarship and praxis Design, implement, and assess K-12 and post-secondary classroom/community programs focused on human rights, social justice, and/or critical multicultural education. Financial Resources Federal financial aid, state, and university resources are available as funding to newly admitted and current USF School of Education students. In order to offset the cost of graduate education tuition, many School of Education courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening, and/or on alternating weekends. Most students find they can maintain a full time job while earning their credential, master’s or doctoral degree. However, if your program requires you to spend time in a classroom (i.e. student teaching) or to complete a fieldwork or traineeship experience, such commitments will interfere with a normal workday. Visit our website to learn more about financial resources for this program. Careers Graduates of the IME Doctoral Program work as transformative professionals in a variety of settings both in the U.S. and internationally, such as: CAREER OPTIONS Faculty members at community colleges and universities Teacher leaders in K-12 schools School superintendents Educational researchers Leaders in community and non-governmental organizations Curriculum specialists GRADUATES OF THE IME DOCTORAL PROGRAM Professor and Chair, Urban Education, Loyola Marymount University Professor and Chair, Elementary Education, San Francisco State University Professor, Bilingual and Multicultural Education, California State University, Sacramento Assistant Professor, Reading, Texas Woman's University Faculty, Santa Rosa Junior College and Solano Community College Lecturer, American Studies, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary Director, Bilingual Education, Professional Development and Special Programs, San Jose Unified School District Teacher trainers for international organizations [-]

PhD in Human Sexuality

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 USA San Francisco

This program is unique in providing an accredited doctorate degree in the interdisciplinary field of human sexuality, with concentrations in human sexuality and clinical practice, and in human sexuality policy leadership. [+]

Human Sexuality This program is unique in providing an accredited doctorate degree in the interdisciplinary field of human sexuality. Bringing together clinicians and policy leaders creates a dynamic learning environment that expands holistic sexual literacy knowledge and skills to create individual and societal change. This program is committed to clinical and policy exploration of all human beings in the most diverse and fluid spectrum of sexual and gender variations across the life course, including desires and orientations, identities, behaviors and expressions. This includes individual psychosexual development and functioning, intimate relationships, families, spirituality, and well-being, as reflected in sexual, gender and reproductive health, rights, and policies in the United States and globally. This hybrid program (partially in-person and online), designed for working professionals, begins with an intensive multiday retreat followed by weekend retreats and online work throughout the year. A small cohort is admitted annually, providing a dynamic, small-group experience. This state of the art program consists of two years of coursework, comprehensive exams, and a dissertation (4-year estimated completion). Our program offers comprehensive knowledge, clinical and policy skillsets, cutting-edge scientific research and community engagement with diverse populations. The doctorate includes a dissertation based on original research, as well as deep immersion in the clinical and/or policy realms through intensive clinical proseminars and policy traineeships. This program aims to shape the inter-professional dialogue between clinical practitioners and sexuality policy leaders in the 21st century. Fundamental to the vision of this program is the infusion of existing areas of diversity such as ethnicity, race, gender, social class, ability, and national origin. Foundational courses address theory, methodology, data analysis, and clinical and policy implications of core issues, including culture, sexual socialization, and the spectrum of sexual orientation, gender identity, sexual expression, rights and policies, and women's sexual and reproductive issues in the context of social justice. Application for Fall 2016 opens on November 15, 2015. Priority Deadline: February 1, 2016. We will continue to accept applications until all of the spaces in our programs are filled. [-]

PhD in Asian Philosophies and Cultures

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Full time 2 years September 2017 USA San Francisco

The PhD consists of 36 semester units of coursework, plus two comprehensive examinations and a dissertation. The coursework consists of twelve units within the program, twelve units in Asian-themed electives, and twelve units in general electives. [+]

PhDs in Anthropology. The Asian Philosophies and Cultures doctorate offers intensive study in the spiritual and philosophical traditions of South Asia, China, and the Himalayan regions, both with respect to classical and contemporary contexts. The PhD consists of 36 semester units of coursework, plus two comprehensive examinations and a dissertation. The coursework consists of twelve units within the program, twelve units in Asian-themed electives, and twelve units in general electives. Graduates of our PhD program are expected to: 1. Make an original and substantive contribution to the disciplines of Asian religion or philosophy. Think independently to develop questions, concepts, and methodologies. Identify new research opportunities within these fields. Reflect critically upon the histories, tenets, and traditions in their major field. Keep abreast of current advances within these fields and related areas. 2. Demonstrate advanced research and writing skills Synthesize existing knowledge, identifying and accessing appropriate resources and other sources of relevant information and critically analyzing and evaluating their own findings and those of others. Master application of existing research methodologies, techniques, and technical skills. Understand the range of issues in the comparative approach to religion and philosophy. Demonstrate ability to write about complex ideas and research in a professional and nuanced manner. 3. Demonstrate commitment to participation in the community of scholars. Show commitment to personal professional development through engagement in professional societies, publication, and other knowledge transfer modes. Show commitment to supporting and promoting learning through teaching, collaborative inquiry, or professional practice. 4. Demonstrate ability to situate scholarship in relationship to social and personal transformation. Situate self in relationship to work and multiple perspectives. Build upon internal passion and vision toward external career and action 5. Demonstrate professional skills. Adhere to ethical standards in the discipline and in relation to the communities studied. Listen, give, and receive feedback effectively. Communicate in a style appropriate to the discipline and setting. Appropriately use media for the dissemination of work. PhD Language Recommendation PhD students may be required to demonstrate proficiency in one foreign language if it is deemed essential for the student's dissertation research. Language proficiency may be demonstrated by having passed two years of course work in the study of a language, or additional language study depending on the dissertation topic. [-]

PhD in Anthropology and Social Change

California Institute of Integral Studies
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA San Francisco

The Anthropology and Social Change is unique among graduate programs in the United States due to its focus on activist anthropology. [+]

The Anthropology and Social Change is unique among graduate programs in the United States due to its focus on activist anthropology. We believe that anthropologists should analyze, discuss, and explore the possible; that they should research alternative institutions; that they need to collectively reflect and debate the dilemmas of other possible worlds. This collective effort of understanding "real utopias" takes the form of analytic and ethnographic study of existing alternatives in the present. In a certain sense, we are a department of postcapitalist studies. However, by this complicated word, postcapitalism, we do not wish to refer to some dreamed-up utopia, nor to a speculative exploration of futuristic scenarios. While we agree with Lewis Mumford on the "importance of building castles in the sky," we see as an even more urgent necessity to study politics of alternatives in the here and now: the need to engage with postcapitalist cultures that are already being built, and to understand other worlds that are already possible. Together with the activists of the World Social Forum, we believe that "another world is possible." The role of the new social movements, we are reminded, is not to conquer the world, but to make it anew. What, then, is the role and responsibility of anthropology and other social sciences? In a world riddled with so many crises, few things appear to be more relevant than systematic research of counter-hegemonic knowledge and practices. Social scientists should leave pessimism for better times. Anthropology, in particular, is well equipped to participate in the "nowtopian" task of constructing social scientific knowledge that looks beyond capitalism, hierarchy, and ecological disaster. The practice and technique of ethnography provides an important model of a possible "postcapitalist" social science. As one contemporary anthropologist, a friend of our program, recently noted, when one "carries out an ethnography, one observes what people do, and then tries to tease out the hidden symbolic, moral, or pragmatic logics that underlie their actions; one tries to get at the way people's habits and actions make sense in ways that they are not themselves completely aware of." We ask our students to do precisely this: to look at those who are creating viable alternatives, to try to figure out what might be the larger implications of what they are already doing, and then to offer those ideas back, not as prescriptions, but as contributions, possibilities-as gifts. This program offers the space and the possibility to engage with many traditions of radical scholarship and emancipatory social science. We believe that anthropologists should analyze, discuss, and explore the possible; that they should research alternative institutions; that they need to collectively reflect and debate the dilemmas of activist anthropology. The collective effort of understanding "real utopias" takes the form of analytic and ethnographic study of real historical alternatives in the present. This, in turn, requires a serious engagement with social movements involved in the production of alternatives. Students are expected to have an excellent command of history, debates, and perspectives of contemporary social movements. These movements exist in the historical, social, and epistemological context of colonization, development, and globalization. As contributors to the book Contesting Development remind us, more then one in six humans now live in slums, over one billion in a world of jobless growth, or no growth. Solutions offered by mainstream social science are often the source of the problem, and our students are expected to have a good understanding of intertwined historical processes of colonization, development, and liberal modernity. The doctoral program is distinctive for its focus on alternatives. What are some of them? Worker cooperatives in Oakland, social centers in Italy, autonomous systems of justice in Guerrero, community gardens in Detroit, occupied self-managed factories in Argentina, "good government" of the Zapatistas, buen vivir (good life) and plurinationalism in Bolivia, participatory democracy in Kerala, solidarity economics of Mondragon, participatory economics in Winnipeg, pedagogy of the block in African-American communities, alternative environmentalism in Afro-Colombian river regions, legal pluralism, autonomy of migration, marginalized medical practices in South Asia, solidarity unionism in New York City, communal agriculture in Malawi, shack dweller democracy in South Africa, Copwatch in LA, biodiversity in Brazil, restorative justice in Ohio, knowledge commons and globalization, independent media, and autonomous food systems in Japan, are only some of the examples of postcapitalist possibilities. There are so many more, and one of the responsibilities of our students is to discover them. The program is distinctive in its emphasis on: Postcapitalist analysis of historical alternatives in the present Global social movements and lost revolutionary treasures Issues of colonialism, globalization, development Anarchist, Marxist, feminist theoretical perspectives Political ecology Integration of activism and scholarship: developing research skills in activist ethnography, intercultural translation, and emancipatory research Many classes include a research component, and the doctoral dissertation is based on activist ethnographic research. Activist ethnographic frameworks include participatory and collaborative research approaches as well as more recent research techniques and strategies associated with militant research and co-research approaches. Part-Time Curriculum Students may pursue a part-time course of study in consultation with their academic advisor. PhD Admissions Requirements Entry into the PhD program in Anthropology and Social Change requires a master's degree. Students with an MA from another school or from another department at CIIS may require up to one additional year of coursework as part of their PhD program. Students with an MA in Anthropology and Social Change from CIIS do not require additional coursework. The Anthropology and Social Change PhD concentration is a residential program. We are interested in creating a convivial community of scholars, not competitive academics; we believe in educating intellectuals and not professionals. We believe that professors and students are co-learners, and that learning, and knowledge production, is a participatory, inclusive, and horizontal process. Our program is probably not the best fit for those who want to be taught in the vertical space of a traditional classroom. Rather, this is a unique and inspiring place for activist scholars who are passionate about co-creating knowledge that is useful, relevant, and integral. Applicants must meet the general admissions requirements of the Institute. In addition, two letters of recommendation, one from an academic advisor or someone familiar with the applicant's ability to do academic work, and one from a supervisor in a recent professional or volunteer setting, are required. Applicants are also asked to include a recent sample of scholarly writing. The required autobiographical statement should describe significant events in the applicant's life that have led to the decision to pursue admission to this department. A goal statement that includes areas of academic interest should be included. Admission to the PhD Program without an MA in Anthropology from CIIS Students entering the PhD program without an MA in Anthropology and Social Change from CIIS are required to take an additional 12 to 15 units of MA-level coursework within the Anthropology and Social Change Program. Students may require an additional year in which to complete these courses. Once students are admitted, advisors will facilitate the drafting of a tailored curriculum contract that incorporates these additional courses and suggests a timeline. These additional courses include three of the following five courses: Ideas for Action: Social Theory for Radical Change Global Social Movements Unthinking Social Science Radical Theory Radical Political Economy [-]

PhD in Medieval and Neo-Latin Studies

Charles University Faculty of Arts
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Czech Republic Prague

Graduates have a sound knowledge of current trends in the field and are able to adopt a creative approach to relevant source material. Graduates are equipped to work with original Latin documents, i.e. literary and diplomatic manuscripts, incunabula, paleotypes and old prints, being able to interpret and prepare them for publication and translation. [+]

PhDs in Anthropology. The language of instruction is English. Medieval and Neo-Latin Studies is a fee-paying programme; the annual study fee is 70 000 CZK. Description of the entrance examination and evaluation criteria entrance examination: one-round examination, interview Discussion of the project of PhD dissertation: 0–30 points; Assessment of the Applicant’s previous studies, research and other academic activities: 0–15 points; Assessment of the Applicant´s knowledge of secondary literature (based on the list submitted by the Applicant): 0–15 points. The Programme Board does not offer or impose particular PhD topics, but research projects should fall within the research orientation of the Institute of Greek and Latin Studies. Applicants have to suggest research projects according to their personal preferences in the field of Medieval or Neo-Latin Studies. Suggested PhD topics must be consulted beforehand with the Chair of the Programme Board. Conditions for admission The applicant is admitted if he/she obtains a minimum of 30 points in the entrance examination and, at the same time, scores enough points to place among the maximum number of students admitted to the respective programme (refer to the Admission Procedure Specifications applicable to the individual degree programmes); admissions will be granted to all applicants who score the same number of points as the applicant who comes last in the ranking of admissions. The full-time and combined forms of study use different maximum numbers of admissions. Applicants cannot be admitted without supplying, no later than on the enrolment day, evidence of their prior education. Information on the exercise of graduates Graduates have a sound knowledge of current trends in the field and are able to adopt a creative approach to relevant source material. Graduates are equipped to work with original Latin documents, i.e. literary and diplomatic manuscripts, incunabula, paleotypes and old prints, being able to interpret and prepare them for publication and translation. Having been trained in philology and literary history and acquired the foundations of relevant historical disciplines (codicology, palaeography, diplomatics) and of cultural history, graduates are equipped to place mediaeval and early modern works into the context of their time and also to interpret them as a factor influencing the culture and society of subsequent eras. [-]

PhD in Sociology

Charles University Faculty of Arts
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Czech Republic Prague

Graduates have a broad overview of key issues in current sociological theory and methodology, a thorough grounding in a wide range of analytical methods of quantitative and qualitative research, and the ability to use and combine these procedures. [+]

The language of instruction is English. Sociology is a fee-paying programme; the annual study fee is 70 000 CZK. Description of the entrance examination and evaluation criteria entrance examination: one-round examination, interview Expert debate on the project of PhD thesis: 0–30 points; Assessment of previous professional activities and studies of the applicant: 0–15 points; Demonstration of knowledge (theory, methodology): 0–15 points. Suggested topics of the upcoming project dissertation: The topic is based on an individual choice. The programme allows, in addition to the thematic focus on sociology, also the specialization in social work and in some criminological topics. Generally said, it is based on the research programme of the departments, especially PROGRESS (see also our teachers’ profiles). Suggested PhD topics must be consulted beforehand with the Chair of the Programme Board. Conditions for admission The applicant is admitted if he/she obtains a minimum of 30 points in the entrance examination and, at the same time, scores enough points to place among the maximum number of students admitted to the respective programme (refer to the Admission Procedure Specifications applicable to the individual degree programmes); admissions will be granted to all applicants who score the same number of points as the applicant who comes last in the ranking of admissions. The full-time and combined forms of study use different maximum numbers of admissions. Applicants cannot be admitted without supplying, no later than on the enrolment day, evidence of their prior education. Information on the exercise of graduates Graduates have a broad overview of key issues in current sociological theory and methodology, a thorough grounding in a wide range of analytical methods of quantitative and qualitative research, and the ability to use and combine these procedures. They are able to formulate and solve demanding research questions, specify relevant hypotheses, find appropriate methods of solution, and formulate relevant expert opinions. Graduates may seek employment as researchers and university teachers as well as in specialist and management positions in both the state and commercial sectors. [-]

PhD in Anthropology

Charles University Third Faculty of Medicine
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Czech Republic Prague

The aim of the study is to prepare students for scientific research work at the level corresponding to the current requirements of science. In the new study concept integrates physical anthropology, including genetics, ecology and ethology, the sociocultural anthropology in a holistic approach to the study of humans and populations. [+]

PhDs in Anthropology. The aim of the study is to prepare students for scientific research work at the level corresponding to the current requirements of science. In the new study concept integrates physical anthropology, including genetics, ecology and ethology, the sociocultural anthropology in a holistic approach to the study of humans and populations. The task of teaching in general is to learn the theoretical foundations of the field and mastering the techniques and methodology of scientific research work. In physical anthropology the methods include somatometry, osteometry, anthropological somatoscopy, dermatoglyphic, basics of rentgenometry and other morphological and morphometric approaches, including the newly introduced 3D non-contact techniques. Methods of molecular genetics entails PCR in situ hybridization, DNA sequencing and restriction analysis methods. Research programs of the training center focused on tracking postnatal growth and development of children in normal and pathological, research on nutrition and obesity, the study of morphological variability in populations, the impact of environmental factors on the ontogenetic development of man, watching craniofacial growth of normal and abnormal congenital defects, evaluation dermatoglyphic characteristics particularly in relation to developmental disorders and to analyze the patterns of human behavior. Study program in anthropology is provided mainly in the field of forensic anthropology and palaeopathology. Molecular genetic studies in addition to forensic applications include analysis receptor genes and genetic polymorphisms in the variable regions of human chromosomes and genetics of musculoskeletal and encogenetics. They are also directed to exploring the molecular basis of certain pathological conditions. There is experimental facilities of the Institute of Experimental Medicine of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. Especially in the fields of teratology, physiology, neuroscience and toxicology. From the medical field of study comprises a contact issue of Epidemiology, orthopedics, rehabilitation, endocrinology, pediatrics, and other disciplines. The study program is carried out in collaboration with the Institute of Experimental Medicine and the Institute of Archaeology of the AS CR. Description of the entrance examination and evaluation criteria Entrance exams take the form of an interview on the topic of the PhD Thesis, demonstrating the technical skills of the applicant for doctoral study program and the ability to work with specialized foreign literature. Conditions for admission Duly completed master’s study program, i.e. submission of a certified copy of the university diploma or the nostrification of university education, by 30 September 2017. Submission of the application form including all relevant enclosures, i.e. CV, professional reference, payment receipt of the admission fee of 540 CZK to bank account number 22734101/0100 by 30 April 2017 Submission of the dissertation project by 30 April 2017 Successful completion of the exam, which is based on appropriate knowledge in the scientific field chosen. Recommended literature, sample questions Readings are recommended by individual potential supervisors, and are based on professional issues of the potential dissertation and the chosen particular discipline. In particular, monographs and respected IF magazines. Suggested literature and resources can be viewed within the profiles of the specific supervisors. [-]

PhD in Kinanthropology

Charles University Faculty of Physical Education and Sport
Campus Full time Part time 4 years September 2017 Czech Republic Prague + 1 more

The graduate of doctoral studies possesses a deep and comprehensive knowledge and is well versed in a broad spectrum of scientific principles. He/she is familiar with the research methods, is capable of providing individual scientific work with academic and professional integrity, while observing the ethical conventions of research work. [+]

Kinanthropology is a multidisciplinary scientific branch which deals with the complex effects of intentional and spontaneous movement activity on human personality development in the bio-psycho-social context, and conditions in the areas of physical education and sport, physiotherapy and remedial physical education, including their effective management. Description of the entrance examination and evaluation criteria Each candidate must go through the admissions process. The entrance exam is conducted orally before an examining board and the applicant’s competence is examined. The examining committee evaluates: 1. Quality of the dissertation project and of its elaboration – the project shall have the following structure: introduction, literature review, objective(s) of the work, it shall specify a hypothesis and a methodology corresponding to its type and thematic focus. Maximum number of points for this aspect – 20. 2. Previous professional activities in kinantropology – here, any previous activities relating to the project, in particular publication activities, shall be assessed – 20 points for an impact journal, 14 points for SCOPUS, 12 points for ERIH, 8 points for a reviewed journal or for speaking at the SVK (= Student Scientific Conference) or another scientific conference. The candidate shall receive a full number of points if he/she is the author, or half that number when he/she is a co-author. Maximum number of points for this aspect – 20. 3. The topic´s relation to the research orientation of the instructor and to his research projects – there must be clear harmony between the topic proposed and the instructor´s research orientation – 5 points for an non-university grant of the instructor, 5 points for compliance with the instructor´s scientific orientation. Maximum number of points for this aspect – 10. 4. Quality of the presentation of the project by the candidate: 0-5 points for the quality of the presentation, 0-5 points for responses to questions asked by the examining board. Maximum number of points for this aspect – 10. Each member of the examining committee grades paragraphs 3 and 4 on a scale of points – 0 to 10 points for each item, item 1 and 2 is evaluated on a scale of 0 to 20 points. The maximum number of points awarded by one examiner is 60 points. The arithmetic mean is calculated on the basis of the point evaluation of each member of the examining board. The result is rounded to the nearest whole number – for values from 0.0 to0.49 inthe downward direction to the nearest whole number. For values from 0.50 to0.99 inthe upward direction to the nearest whole number. The ranking of applicants is decided based on the total number of points. The dean of the faculty determines the point limit for admission. Conditions for admission Duly completed master’s study program, i.e. submission of a certified copy of the university diploma or the nostrification of university education, by 30 September 2017. Submission of the application form including all relevant enclosures, i.e. CV, professional reference, payment receipt of the admission fee of 540 CZK to bank account number 43-9685580247/0100 by 30 April 2017 Submission of the dissertation project by 30 April 2017 Successful completion of the exam. Information on the exercise of graduates Kinantropology is an interdisciplinary field of study; therefore, the PhD graduates are employed primarily in science, research and education. Another significant area of employment is state administration and enterprise. [-]

PhD in General Anthropology

Charles University Faculty of Humanities
Campus Full time Part time 3 years September 2017 Czech Republic Prague + 1 more

Graduates, proficient in methods and practical aspects of scientific research as regards the general anthropological disciplines, are able to conduct field researches into anthropological issues in line with their specializations, while observing a scientist’s code of ethic. They are able to accurately formulate the results of their scientific work so as to publish them in high-standard journals or to responsibly popularise them. [+]

PhDs in Anthropology. The doctoral study programme at CU FHs is organised in the full-time (3 years) and correspondence form of study. The programme allows studies focused on philosophical, historical, socio-cultural and socio-linguistic antropology and human ethology. The task of the programme in general is grasping the theoretical basics and methods of this field and mastering the methodology of academic research. The curriculum of Ph.D. students includes: - The studies are organised in two modules, whereas the first module is compulsory for all students in the programme, the second one is selected on the basis of the consultations with the supervisor. - Ph.D. seminar - a compulsory exam in a living language - the defence of the student’s dissertation The concept of the study programme is determined by the department council. Description of the entrance examination and evaluation criteria The exam consists of a discussion about the project of the dissertation and a check of basic assumptions for the study. Entrance examination will check the ability of the applicant to deal with the dissertation project. The questions of the entrance interview primarily focus on the theme of the applicant’s research project (max. 10 points). Conditions for admission Conditions of acceptance: 1. To enter the admission process, a completed application for doctoral studies must be submitted by April, 30th 2017 at latest, including the following attachments: The brief professional biography; The proposal of a dissertation project. The project of a dissertation (in the range of about 4 pages) should contain the theoretical background, a review of previous research in this field, his/her own research questions, a proposed methodology and research techniques, a list of literature, a schedule of its realisation, and justification of its relevance for the historical sociology. The project must contain the proposal of a tutor (name), selected from the list of tutors approved by the Program Council; The overview of recent publications and other scientific activities of the applicant (participation in conferences, participation in research projects, etc.). All applicants have to demonstrate a proof of completion of university studies in a master´s degree program (applicants who complete master´s degree program after the deadline for submission of applications must demonstrated this by September, 30th 2017). 2. Graduation from a master’s degree program. 3. Defence of the project of applicant's thesis (submitted as a part of the study application). 4. To gain the minimal sum of points specified by the dean. Information on the exercise of graduates The goal of the study programme in anthropology is to prepare students for academic research work at the level required by contemporary science. The graduate combines knowledge from all fields in a holistic approach to studying man and populations, to overcoming ethnic and social differences and attempts to observe current processes in their historical and cultural contexts. [-]

PhD in Anthropology

University of Johannesburg
Campus Full time 3 years February 2017 South Africa Johannesburg

The Doctoral study programme comprises a thesis written under supervision that makes an original contribution to the field of Anthropology on a topic selected in consultation with the Department of Anthropology and Development Studies. A Doctoral defence (of the proposal and the thesis) is required in accordance with the regulations of the Faculty of Humanities. An article ready for publication on the thesis content is also required. [+]

The Doctoral study programme comprises a thesis written under supervision that makes an original contribution to the field of Anthropology on a topic selected in consultation with the Department of Anthropology and Development Studies. A Doctoral defence (of the proposal and the thesis) is required in accordance with the regulations of the Faculty of Humanities. An article ready for publication on the thesis content is also required. Admission requirements A Master’s Degree in Anthropology and a final course mark of at least 65% in the particular discipline. Contact details Name: Prof David Moore Tel: 011 559 2979/2859 / Email: dbmoore@uj.ac.za [-]

MPhil/PhD Research Degrees in Gender Studies

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time 3 - 4 years September 2017 United Kingdom London

The MPhil/PhD in Gender Studies is a unique programme combining cutting edge theorizing in Gender Studies with the special areas expertise related to Africa, Asia and the Middle East which has been a trademark of SOAS. The Centre for Gender Studies welcomes applications from research students for our MPhil/PhD programme in all areas of Gender Studies. The Centre places its emphasis on the acquisition of critical theoretical skills and in-depth regional knowledge across disciplines with specific reference to Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Members of the Centre and current research students work on an exceptionally wide range of topics, both theoretical and empirical. Supervision for research students can be provided across this wide range. The Centre houses a training programme in Gender Studies for research students the work of which is supported by the organisation of regular Centre seminars. [+]

PhDs in Anthropology. Research Degrees in Gender Studies Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full-time The MPhil/PhD in Gender Studies is a unique programme combining cutting edge theorizing in Gender Studies with the special areas expertise related to Africa, Asia and the Middle East which has been a trademark of SOAS. The Centre for Gender Studies welcomes applications from research students for our MPhil/PhD programme in all areas of Gender Studies. The Centre places its emphasis on the acquisition of critical theoretical skills and in-depth regional knowledge across disciplines with specific reference to Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Members of the Centre and current research students work on an exceptionally wide range of topics, both theoretical and empirical. Supervision for research students can be provided across this wide range. The Centre houses a training programme in Gender Studies for research students the work of which is supported by the organisation of regular Centre seminars. For information regarding the application process, please contact the Research and Admissions Tutor Dr Ruba Salih: Phone: +44 (0)20 7898 4245 Email: ruba.salih@soas.ac.uk Academic Staff and their Research Areas Professor Nadje Al-Ali Professor of Gender Studies Gender theory; feminist activism; women & gender in the Middle East; women’s movements and feminism in Middle East; secularism and Islamism; transnational migration, diaspora mobilization; gendering violence, war and peace, Iraq. Professor Fareda Banda Professor of the Laws of Africa Human Rights of Women, English Family Law, Comparative Family Law focusing on Africa, Law and Society in Africa, Alternative Dispute Resolution. Professor William G. Clarence-Smith Professor of the Economic History of Asia and Africa Historical interplay between Islamic law and same-sex relationships, transgender identities, and Female Genital Cutting, with special reference to Southeast Asia; colonialism, diasporas, labour, transport, beverages and stimulants, and agriculture and livestock, with particular reference to Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Indian Ocean. Dr Steve Dodd Senior Lecturer in Japanese Modern Japanese literature, with particular interest in representations of the native place (furusato), gender/sexuality and modernity. Dr Kai Easton Lecturer in African Literature and Diaspora Studies Colonial and postcolonial studies, especially South African literature (the Cape, Wicomb, Coetzee); gender and the culture of travel; Indian Ocean diasporas; theories of fiction and history. Dr Christopher Gerteis Lecturer in the History of Contemporary Japan Modern and Contemporary Japanese history. Social and cultural history of the 20th century, especially the intersection of consumer capitalism and historical memory. Dr Rachel Harrison Reader in Thai Cultural Studies Modern Thai Literature and Cinema; culture and gender studies with reference to Thailand; literary criticism and South East Asian Literatures in a comparative context; Western film set in South East Asia. Dr Sian Hawthorne Lecturer in Critical Theory and the Study of Religions Associate Member, Centre for Media and Film Studies Supervisor, Centre for Gender Studies Feminist Philosophy; Myth and Mythmaking; Critical Theory (particularly poststructural, psychoanalytic, and postcolonial theory; the work of Jacques Derrida and Julia Kristeva); Narrativity; Cultural Memory; Gender Theory and the Study of Religions; Feminist Historiography; Disability Studies. Dr Angela Impey Lecturer in Music Applied ethnomusicology; music, human rights and development, and music and gender – mainly with reference to southern Africa and the African Horn. Professor Deniz Kandiyoti Professor in Development Studies Post-Soviet transitions in Central Asia and post-conflict reconstruction in Afghanistan; gender and development. Dr Laleh Khalili Senior Lecturer in the Politics of the Middle East Research Tutor Centre for Gender Studies Counterinsurgencies, nationalism, and political violence, and their intersections with gender. Dr Prabha Kotiswaran Lecturer in Law Feminist Legal Theory; women and law in South Asia; law and society; law and social movements; criminal Law. Dr Lola Martinez Reader in Anthropology with reference to Japan Japan, maritime anthropology, religion, gender, anthropology of tourism, mass media, local and global film traditions. Dr Ben Murtagh Lecturer in Indonesian and Malay Main research interests are Indonesian and Malay literature, both traditional and modern and Indonesian cinema. Dr Caroline Osella Reader in the Anthropology of South Asia Masculinities, sexuality, performance and fashion. Most of her research takes place both in south India and with Indian migrants based in the G.C.C. states. Dr Wen-chin Ouyang Reader in Arabic Literature Classical and modern Arabic literature and culture, with emphasis on narrative and storytelling; comparative narratology and critical theory; gendered thinking and discourse. Dr Parvathi Raman Lecturer in Social Anthropology Chair, Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies Construction of Indian identity in South Africa; political and cultural identities in the South Asian diaspora, African and Asian Communities in Britain, and transnational political iconography. Dr Rahul Rao International Security; Indian foreign policy; Political Theory; Social Movements; Human Rights Dr Ruba Salih Reader in Gender Studies & Chair of the Centre for Gender Studies Gender, Islam and modernity in the Middle East and Europe; Islamic feminism, secular and religious women’s movements in the Middle East, transnational migration and gender; multiculturalism and citizenship; Islam in Europe, globalization; disapora and refugee studies; the Palestine question. Professor Timon Screech Professor in the History of Art Professor Screech is the author of some ten books on the visual culture of the Edo period. In the first of gender studies, his best-know book is Sex and the Floating World: Erotic Images in Japan, 1700-1820 (Reaktion, 1999). Professor Annabelle Sreberny Professor of Global Media Director of the Centre for Media and Film Studies at SOAS Feminist rethinking of the nature of the "political"; women’s movements and alternative media and on women’s media and representation under the Islamic Republic of Iran. Dr Gabriele vom Bruck Lecturer in Social Anthropology Her research in Yemen has focused on hereditary elites and the intersection of religion and politics; gender differences as located within male bodies; performative gender, and women’s male names as body camouflage. Professor Lynn Welchman Professor in Islamic and Middle Eastern Law Islamic Law Palestine and international humanitarian law; laws of the Middle East and North Africa, especially comparative family law, human rights, gender and law. Dr Amina Yaqin Lecturer in Post-colonial Studies & Urdu Postcolonial Theory and literature, Gender Studies, Diasporic literatures (South Asia), Comparative literature, Pakistani culture, Muslims in Britain. She has published essays on gender and sexuality in Urdu poetry, Pakistani culture, Indian literature in English and the Islamic Barbie. [-]

PhD Research Degrees in Anthropology & Sociology

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Social anthropology is widely regarded by employers as an excellent training, equipping holders of the degree with a range of employable skills. The value and relevance of the discipline are evidenced by the great variety and distinction of careers SOAS anthropology graduates have embarked upon with success. [+]

Research Degrees in Anthropology & Sociology In the first year, every MPhil student is appointed a three-person research committee comprising a principal supervisor, a second supervisor and the Research Tutor. MPhil students attend the weekly Research Training Seminar and the Research Methods course, and they take relevant language training. MPhil students may also be required to take additional regional, thematic or theory courses related to their chosen specialisation. Upon successful completion of a 20,000-word research report and fieldwork proposal, MPhil students are upgraded to PhD status and commence fieldwork. The fieldwork experience forms the basis of a 100,000-word dissertation which should demonstrate original thinking and make a significant contribution to the discipline. During the post-fieldwork period, PhD students attend the weekly post-fieldwork seminar and have the opportunity to present their work in progress. MPhil and PhD students are encouraged to attend the variety of seminars and workshops that take place across the School. Why a PhD in Anthropology Social anthropology is widely regarded by employers as an excellent training, equipping holders of the degree with a range of employable skills. The value and relevance of the discipline are evidenced by the great variety and distinction of careers SOAS anthropology graduates have embarked upon with success. Anthropologists have a global perspective when they come to make career choices. The speed and ease of worldwide communication networks is expanding the need to understand and interpret the socio-cultural patterns, values and life styles of others. Social anthropologists therefore find opportunity in diverse fields including international business, information technology, the media, library and museum services, and tourism. The multi-cultural nature of modern society has triggered a need in many spheres for staff with a trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities, and our graduates may be found throughout the education sector, health sector, local government, and in advisory services of many kinds. Increasing numbers work in the field of development at home or overseas, with UN agencies or non governmental organizations, and others work as freelance consultants. The SOAS PhD in Social Anthropology is recognized by the ESRC as both a +3 and 1+3 course. (See the links to the ESRC and MA Anthropology Research Methods) [-]

PhD in Anthropology

Binghamton University
Campus Full time 4 - 5 years September 2017 USA Binghamton

The Doctor of Philosophy in Anthropology is awarded to students who have shown mastery of the general materials of anthropology and a substantial command of the specialized subject matter of one or more of the four subfields... [+]

PhDs in Anthropology. PhD in Anthropology Anthropology seeks to understand the nature and origins of human biological variability, cultural diversity and social formations through systematic exploration, scientific examination and the application of theory to human populations and their artifacts, including their social configurations, past and present. Although anthropology has historically been most successful in the analysis of small sociocultural systems, its current challenge is to situate the direct objects of study in their global contexts in both space and time. The discipline draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus. While training in the traditional four subfields of archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology and social/cultural anthropology are offered in the department at Binghamton, students are encouraged to specialize along tracks that cross these sub-disciplinary boundaries. A central objective of graduate training in anthropology is the ability to develop an original research design and to communicate the research findings in a research paper, thesis or dissertation of publishable quality. All recipients of graduate degrees submit and defend formal, written demonstration of their ability to apply appropriate analysis to an original research project, except for the MS degree for which an oral demonstration of ability is required. The Doctor of Philosophy Degree The Doctor of Philosophy in Anthropology is awarded to students who have shown mastery of the general materials of anthropology and a substantial command of the specialized subject matter of one or more of the four subfields, and who have successfully carried out and formally presented research judged to constitute an original contribution to the discipline. Admission to the Doctoral Program Students without substantial experience beyond the BA are not normally admitted directly to the PhD program. Although an MA is not required for admission or for the completion of the PhD, most students complete an MA in the course of their doctoral studies, either by submitting a thesis or through the two-paper option (see MA requirements). Applicants with graduate work at other universities are required to submit GRE aptitude test scores along with their applications, TOEFL where applicable (see MA Program admission requirements). Course requirements for the Doctoral Degree in Anthropology Minimum credits satisfying master's requirements (subfields, ANTH 501 and 504, and electives): 30 Electives (exclusive of ANTH 580, 590, 591, 599, 698, 699, and including no more than 8 credits of ANTH 597, and not more than 8 credits of course work outside of anthropology) to be chosen with the advice of the student's guidance committee and the written approval of its chair: 26 ANTH 699, Dissertation, as required to maintain registration after admission to candidacy. Total minimum credit hours: 56 Students who have completed an MA at another university or in another discipline may request credit for up to 30 credit hours toward the PhD, and they may request exemption from one or more of the subfield distribution requirements on the basis of previous graduate coursework in the relevant area. Students should address such requests to the Director of Graduate Studies. Foreign language and research skill See language requirement for the master's degree. Students having completed an MA at another university that required a language examination may submit evidence of having satisfied this requirement. In some instances, the choice of research area by the student may require demonstration of additional language proficiency (e.g. due to a lack of relevance of the language competence previously demonstrated). Students should seek the advice of the members of their doctoral committee regarding appropriate language and research skills for the pursuit of their individualized programs of study. Admission to candidacy To be admitted to candidacy for the Doctor of Philosophy in Anthropology, a student must have satisfied at least the minimal course credit requirement (at least 56 hours, exclusive of courses graded below B-, with a GPA of 3.5 or better) and language requirements as determined by the student's doctoral committee. In addition, a student must: pass a written examination covering three literature areas (one of which may be a regional competency examination) propose a dissertation research project in colloquium before the department pass an oral examination administered by the guidance committee in which questions address both the written exam and the colloquium Within six months after admission to candidacy, submit a dissertation prospectus approved by the student's doctoral committee. Granting the degree Each doctoral candidate must demonstrate the ability to complete an original research project and submit the findings in a dissertation acceptable to the student's dissertation committee. Upon approval by this committee, the dissertation must be defended in a public defense attended by the candidate's committee, an outside reader appointed by and representing the dean of the Graduate School and any others who wish to attend. A successful defense and submission of the dissertation to the Graduate School complete the requirements for awarding the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Anthropology. Guidelines for Graduate Study in Anthropology Students are advised to consult the department's Guidelines for Graduate Study for additional information regarding graduate orientation, mentoring, funding, time-to-degree expectations and degree requirements. Professional Development Our program’s central objective is to train students in the development of original research design, and to communicate findings in publishable papers. Faculty and students develop close working relationships. Independent study is encouraged and closely guided through academic advising. Our department hosts a summer session class called the Archaeology Field School program, where students have the opportunity to earn credit as well as gain practical field experience. Outings in 2014 included excavation training and scientific analysis techniques at a historic 17th Century estate in New York. Binghamton University also boasts the Public Archaeology Facility, one of the largest facilities of its kind in the country. The Career Resource Library is available as a tool for students to learn how to use anthropological skills in industry, business, management and health research; how to teach anthropology; careers as independent consultants; ethnographic research; preparing to become an applied anthropologist; and the nature of anthropological fieldwork. After You Graduate MA graduates are prepared to be instructors at community colleges or pursue doctoral studies. Recent doctoral graduates are employed in positions at the New York State Department of Health, the National Geographic Society, Museum of International Folk Art, Purdue University and the University of Tennessee. Deadlines Fall: January 15 (Funding) / April 15 Spring: October 15 [-]

PhD in Anthropology and Human Genetics

Charles University Faculty of Science
Campus Full time Part time 4 years September 2017 Czech Republic Prague + 1 more

A Ph.D. graduate in Anthropology and Human Genetics is educated in both the theoretical and practical aspects of biological anthropology and human biology related to the biological roots of human beings, and human variability and adaptability in both time and place. [+]

The discipline is focused on physical antropology and human biology, genetics, ecology and ethology. It deals predominantly with ontogenetic and phylogenetic development of man, morphological variability and evolution of populations, ethnic anthropology and ethnology, human growth and its disorders, body composition and nutrition, action of environmental and social factors on man, human behavior and with characteristics at various levels of biologic organization and their heredity. Molecular genetics includes analyses of different human receptor genes and genetic polymorphisms in variable regions of human chromosomes. Applied specialities include forensic, functional, clinical and industrial anthropology. Special position occupies skeletal and dental anthropology. Description of the entrance examination and evaluation criteria The entrance examination has one round and is held as an interview. In exceptional cases, requested in writing by 30 April 2017, the dean can permit entrance examinations to take place via information and communication technology. During the entrance examination the candidate must demonstrate technical and linguistic skills to study the given field along with attributes necessary for scientific work. The entrance examination also takes into account the interest of the candidate in pursuing specific doctoral work with a particular supervisor and the candidate’s ability to handle this topic. The maximum score of the examination is 100 points. Conditions for admission Submission of a properly completed application, including prescribed appendices, and payment of the application fee by 30 April 2017. Completion of a master’s program of study at a university documented by a notarized copy of a diploma or certificate of equivalence of a foreign university education, or an original confirmation of completion of the required education by 30 September 2017. The requirement of submitting a notarized copy of a diploma does not apply to master’s graduates of Charles University. Applicants whose request for recognition of a foreign education has not been decided upon by 30 September 2017 may submit the required document by 21 October 2017. Passing grade on the entrance examination All applicants scoring at least 50 points on the entrance examination will be admitted for study. Information on the exercise of graduates A Ph.D. graduate in Anthropology and Human Genetics is educated in both the theoretical and practical aspects of biological anthropology and human biology related to the biological roots of human beings, and human variability and adaptability in both time and place. The key disciplines in the graduate curricula are human evolution and ecology, auxology, human anatomy, and also molecular anthropology concentrated on both the human past as well as clinical and biomedical research. Ph.D. graduates are prepared to apply practical knowledge in morphological research but also in methods of molecular anthropology and sophisticated 3D computer-assisted analyses, primarily in fields such as clinical, functional, ergonomic, forensic anthropology, human osteology, archaeology, forensic sciences, human genetics and biomedical technologies. [-]

PhD in Cultural Studies

University of Minho - Institute of Social Sciences
Campus Full time 6 semesters October 2017 Portugal Braga

The PhD in Cultural Studies is a joint educational project of the University of Minho and the University of Aveiro that focus on training, on knowledge consolidation and on the development of creative, promotional, animated, mediated and (inter)cultural dissemination practices. [+]

PhDs in Anthropology. Academic degree: Doctorate ECTS: 180 Duration: 6 curricular semesters Regime: Normal Place: Gualtar Campus, Braga Main Scientific area: Cultural Studies (?) The PhD in Cultural Studies is a joint educational project of the University of Minho and the University of Aveiro that focus on training, on knowledge consolidation and on the development of creative, promotional, animated, mediated and (inter)cultural dissemination practices. The course is largely supported by the skills, capabilities and resources of the Communication and Society Research Centre from the University of Minho. In addition to the teaching and research staff of the Department of Languages and Cultures of the University of Aveiro, the program also includes researchers from all departments of the Institute of Social Sciences of the University of Minho (Communication Sciences, Sociology, Geography and History), and still a large number of researchers from the Institute of Arts and Humanities of the University of Minho. [-]