Part time PhD Degree in Archaeology in London in United Kingdom

View Part time PhD Programs in Archaeology in London United Kingdom 2017

Archaeology

A PhD, also known as a Doctor of Philosophy degree, is a doctorate awarded by a university to the academic who has met all necessary qualifications and can now be considered a doctor in his or her academic field.

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom and Britain, is a sovereign state located off the north-western coast of continental Europe.The two most famous (and oldest) universities are Oxford and Cambridge (often referred to as Oxbridge by many Britons) England also has several other world-class institutions, including several in London (notably Imperial College, the London School of Economics, University College London and King's College London, all are part of London University)

London is the capital of UK, the most populous region and where royal family lives. It has the largest concentration of higher education in Europe with 412 thousand students at 43 universities.

Request Information Part time Doctorate Degrees in Archaeology in London in United Kingdom 2017

Read More

PhD Research Degrees in History of Art and/or Archaeology

SOAS University of London
Campus Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London

While a research degree should be very rewarding personally, it is also a serious and sometimes intense undertaking. Under the current system, a full-time doctoral student has three years to complete a full draft of her or his thesis and then a further one year for writing up (known as a 3+1 degree). There are always solitary moments when carrying out individual research, even if a department has a strong collegiate atmosphere, as ours does. Research degrees are generally undertaken by individuals who aim to become professionals in the field of art history and/or archaeology, whether as academics who carry out research and teach in universities or as curators or educators in museums, libraries or archives, or in any number of other related areas such as academic publishing or even the commercial art world. It is generally a good idea to have some experience of work outside university before applying to a doctoral programme, for example, in some role in a museum or gallery. Embarking on a research degree is not just about the qualification but also about developing as a person and a professional so as to be able to contribute to national and international discourses in, and perhaps also far beyond, the history of art and archaeology. [+]

Part time Doctoral Degrees in Archaeology in London in United Kingdom. Research Degrees in History of Art and/or Archaeology Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Why embark on a Research Degree? While a research degree should be very rewarding personally, it is also a serious and sometimes intense undertaking. Under the current system, a full-time doctoral student has three years to complete a full draft of her or his thesis and then a further one year for writing up (known as a 3+1 degree). There are always solitary moments when carrying out individual research, even if a department has a strong collegiate atmosphere, as ours does. Research degrees are generally undertaken by individuals who aim to become professionals in the field of art history and/or archaeology, whether as academics who carry out research and teach in universities or as curators or educators in museums, libraries or archives, or in any number of other related areas such as academic publishing or even the commercial art world. It is generally a good idea to have some experience of work outside university before applying to a doctoral programme, for example, in some role in a museum or gallery. Embarking on a research degree is not just about the qualification but also about developing as a person and a professional so as to be able to contribute to national and international discourses in, and perhaps also far beyond, the history of art and archaeology. Why at... [-]