PhD Program in Area Studies in Europe

Find PhD Programs in Area Studies in Europe 2017

Area Studies

The PhD can vary depending on the institution and country in which it is awarded. Most scholars pursue a PhD because of strong motivation to contribute to the academic community as well as true curiosity about their chosen field of study. 

 

In all, there are over 4000 Higher Education Institutions in Europe offering a wide range of courses at Bachelor, Masters and Doctorate level. With more and more of these organizations offering English as the language of education for at least some of their degree programs, universities in Europe are now of higher quality than ever before. Universities in Europe offer a friendly welcome to foreign students and to give a course of knowledge that meets their profession needs in today’s global demand.

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PhD in Anglophone Literatures and Cultures

Charles University Faculty of Arts
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Czech Republic Prague

Graduates are highly qualified specialists in literary and cultural studies focused on English-speaking countries, especially the literatures and cultures on the British Isles and in North America. [+]

Doctorate Programs in Area Studies in Europe 2017. The language of instruction is English. Anglophone Literatures and Cultures is a fee-paying programme; the annual study fee is 70 000 CZK. Description of the entrance examination and evaluation criteria entrance examination: one-round examination, interview Discussion of the project of PhD dissertation: 0–30 points; Assessment of the Applicant’s previous studies, research and other academic activities: 0–15 points; Assessment of the Applicant´s knowledge of secondary literature (based on the list submitted by the Applicant): 0–15 points. Recommended Dissertation Topics: The Picturesque and Historical Novel Power in British and American Gothic Fiction Imaginary Geographies in British and American Romanticism Narratives and Histories of the Settlement of the American West Globalisation in Contemporary Irish Drama Reflections of the "Celtic Tiger" in Contemporary Irish Fiction The Politics of Northern Irish Theatre, 1900-1969 Belfast as a Literary Topos Old English Documentary Prose as A Background to Old English Poetry Topoi in Old English Old Testament Poetry Fabliaux Elements in Middle English Poetry Narrative Theory and the Development of Contemporary Canadian Fiction by Aboriginal Writers Tropes of Immigration, Migration and Travel in the History of Canadian Literature Edward Thomas, Robert Frost and the Poetry of Modernism Ideology and Nation in 19th century Irish Poetry Translation as Theme in Twentieth-Century Irish/American/British Poetry Yeats and the Celtic Revival Politics on the Restoration Stage Family in the Eighteenth-century Novel Travel Writing and Women History in British Post-war Women's Fiction Theoretical Otherness, Local Color Fiction and Kate Chopin Narrative Space and Thomas Pynchon Literature and Silence Suggested PhD topics must be consulted beforehand with the Chair of the Programme Board. Conditions for admission The applicant is admitted if he/she obtains a minimum of 30 points in the entrance examination and, at the same time, scores enough points to place among the maximum number of students admitted to the respective programme (refer to the Admission Procedure Specifications applicable to the individual degree programmes); admissions will be granted to all applicants who score the same number of points as the applicant who comes last in the ranking of admissions. The full-time and combined forms of study use different maximum numbers of admissions. Applicants cannot be admitted without supplying, no later than on the enrolment day, evidence of their prior education. Information on the exercise of graduates Graduates are highly qualified specialists in literary and cultural studies focused on English-speaking countries, especially the literatures and cultures on the British Isles and in North America. They have a good command of theoretical and methodological approaches, are able to conduct independent research and to teach literary and cultural histories of the United Kingdom, USA, Ireland and other English-speaking countries, and related literary and cultural courses, at tertiary level. They can participate in team research projects and work in international research teams. Czech graduates have a good command of the terminology and style of the discipline in their mother tongue and possess basic knowledge of the reception of Anglophone literatures in Czech culture. [-]

Erasmus Mundus Joint Doctorate TEEME – Text and Event in Early Modern Europe

Charles University Faculty of Arts
Campus Full time 6 semesters October 2017 Czech Republic Prague

TEEME is an international doctoral programme in early modern studies funded by the European Union. It is structured around a unique collaboration between university-based researchers in the Humanities and the cultural and creative sector in four EU countries (United Kingdom, Germany, Portugal, Czech Republic). [+]

TEEME is an international doctoral programme in early modern studies funded by the European Union. It is structured around a unique collaboration between university-based researchers in the Humanities and the cultural and creative sector in four EU countries (United Kingdom, Germany, Portugal, Czech Republic). The partnership will foster intercultural dialogue and disseminate the best research in history, literature and culture to the wider community. On these pages you will find our research profile, a description of the programme and its objectives, details of the consortium universities and the programme's associated partners, as well as information on the application process. TEEME OBJECTIVES TEEME aims to integrate the study of the past with impact on the present. Our principal intellectual concern is the early modern period, understood as lasting from c. 1400 to c. 1700, the foundational age of the current world order with its political divisions and economic dependencies, in which modern European identities were formed in the context of nation-building, imperial ambition and colonial expansion. Students on the programme will bring this period into meaningful relations with current issues and concerns by focusing on the enduring traces that early modern texts and events left, and still leave, on today’s globalized world. History, literature and culture will thus be taught and studied as central to the shaping of the future. The programme’s main objective is to prepare a new generation of research leaders, cultural managers and policy-makers for the demands of a 21st century in which historical forgetfulness and cultural amnesia threaten the integration of an increasingly interconnected world. These challenges will be addressed through an emphasis on forms of cultural and historical understanding – processes that are themselves both conditions of the actual student experience and potential topics of research. By investigating the past from a fully historicized understanding of the present, and by working in international teams, students will acquire the skills and background knowledge necessary to intervene in current debates about global uncertainties and the new world-wide risks faced by culture and society. The need to make the past inform the present in new and substantially different ways is painfully evident in everyday public discourse. For instance, present debates about the ‘clash of cultures’ and the tensions between the local and the global dangerously ignore the experience of our early modern forbears who first ventured out beyond Europe to encounter other cultures, peoples, and religions. Close historical attention reveals that these early encounter stories cannot easily be reduced, as they often are in public perception, to any facile and clear-cut binaries such as the opposition between ‘colonizer’ and ‘colonized’, between Christians and ‘heathens’ (often actually Muslims, Hindus or Jews), or between mobile Europeans and static indigenous people. Instead, such historical encounters were frequently moments of exchange, interaction, and even mutual respect, in which both sides learned and benefited from each other. TEEME’s ambition is to rectify such historical distortions. Through this central focus on the interface between past and present, the programme will both promote greater historical awareness of shared European origins, foster exchange among diverse European and non-European cultures, and offer a unique learning experience to both EU and international students. It will help control negative developments, such as violent nationalism or the radical distrust of foreign cultures, religions and peoples, that often emerge during economic crises and are exacerbated by the lack of nuanced historical understanding. At the same time the programme will enrich and improve current perceptions of European identities and their role in history, as well as engender the transformation of national cultural institutions through the input of knowledge and expertise from different cultures. PHD PROGRAMME The TEEME consortium is committed to a structured, ‘needs-based’ approach to its doctoral programme, recognizing the necessity for formal, high-level generic and subject-specific training accompanied by personal development plans to enable doctoral candidates to pursue effective, independent and original research. Training and coursework are fully integrated in the organization of the programme which is built on the wide experience within the consortium of doctoral supervision, co-tutelle arrangements, and international postgraduate communities. Two of the consortium partners (Kent and FU Berlin) have Graduate Schools which provide a supportive and stimulating interdisciplinary environment for early career researchers. The Kent Graduate School offers a transferable skills development programme and further funding and study opportunities through links with research councils and other national and international organizations. All TEEME students will benefit from this in semester 1. The Dahlem Research School in Berlin provides a unique context for postgraduate students and a systematic training programme in disciplinary, transdisciplinary and transferable skills, as well as further career development measures. Porto and CU Prague have a longstanding tradition in producing top-class Humanities graduates and an excellent track record in research supervision. The dedicated interdisciplinary research centres listed in the research profile organize regular seminars, workshops and conferences throughout the academic year, often with the participation of international speakers. Opportunities exist at all sites to engage in research contexts not specifically dedicated to the early modern period. Students on the programme will be actively encouraged to expand their knowledge and research interests, make useful national and international contacts, and engage in cross-disciplinary debates, by participating in some or all of these activities throughout their three years of study. The programme is divided into six semesters. Each cohort will spend the first semester at Kent which will help to establish a sense of group identity. Kent has been chosen as the location for semester 1 because of the varied training programme offered by its established Graduate School, because the introductory module ‘TEEME: Theory and Practice’, taught through the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, relies on input by Kent and London-based associated partners, and because the local language, English, is also the language of tuition, shared by all students. All training and research activities will receive full recognition in the form of ECTS credits (ECTS: European Credit Transfer System). Over the three years of the degree students will acquire a minimum of 180 credits, split into 120 credits for research activities and work on the thesis (the ‘research strand’) and 60 credits for skills training, curricular elements and the work placement (the ‘skills strand’). Programme elements such as early teambuilding, electronic publication platform and annual conferences ensure a high level of peer support that will strengthen research quality and encourage collaboration across borders. Building on successful co-tutelle arrangements, the international supervisory team will consist of two TEEME staff, one each from the two chosen places of study. All compulsory research and training activities by students will count fully towards the final degree. Depending on the type of activity and/or nature of the taught elements, credits in the skills strand are awarded through certified workshop and seminar attendance, and through the assessment of coursework, exams, presentations, placement reports, or peer-reviewed publications. Credits in the research strand are awarded for research presentations, certified seminar attendance, progress reports, written sections of the thesis, and the thesis itself. The TEEME programme structure requires compulsory publication through the participation of all students in an online publication platform in semester 2. Facilities to enable virtual seminars (Blackboard, Moodle) will be provided through the programme website. Participation in the online workshop will attract credits, and students can obtain further credits through a series of three linked reviews or a scholarly article. All electronic publications will be peer-reviewed and formally assessed by members of the consortium universities. The consortium is committed to disseminating research outcomes in published form. It will reserve a section of the website for electronic publication and use existing links to publishers (including placement providers) to promote publication in hard copy. The research training at all sites will emphasize the importance of publication for the advancement of the subject. Graduates who have chosen FU Berlin as one of their degree-awarding institutions will be required to publish their thesis; all others will be strongly encouraged to do so, either through the TEEME website or through other means appropriate to the discipline. WORK PLACEMENT The institutions have agreed to offer work placements to TEEME students in semester 4 of the programme. Students are encouraged to contact TEEME staff to find out more about each placement. Individual arrangements will be flexible regarding duration and nature of employment. Students will work an average of 180 hours per placement over the course of semester 4. FELLOWSHIPS The EACEA (Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency) have been funding the TEEME programme from 2011 to 2015, during which time 36 full Fellowships were financed by the Agency. Funding came to an end with the intake of the fifth and final TEEME cohort in September 2015. No further Fellowships will be offered by TEEME under the existing Framework Partnership Agreement with the EACEA. OTHER FUNDING OPTIONS Candidates who have been offered a place on the programme will be eligible to apply for partially or fully funded studentships at all four partner universities. Specifically, Kent offers a number of PhD studentships each year in all participating departments to both EU and overseas candidates and supports all research students with a minimum allowance for research expenses each year. The Dahlem Research School at FU Berlin offers a range of travel and mobility grants, as well as start-up and completion scholarships to postgraduate students, both EU and international. Porto participates in a variety of national funding schemes to which researchers can apply for small research grants, short-term scholarships and travel expenses. In Prague students will be able to apply for the grants offered by the Charles University Foundation (GAUK). In addition, students will receive support and guidance to apply for any further funding for which they may be eligible in their home countries. [-]

PhD in Egyptology

Charles University Faculty of Arts
Campus Full time Part time 3 years September 2017 Czech Republic Prague + 1 more

The applicant is admitted if he/she obtains a minimum of 30 points in the entrance examination and, at the same time, scores enough points to place among the maximum number of students admitted to the respective programme (refer to the Admission Procedure Specifications applicable to the individual degree programmes). [+]

Doctorate Programs in Area Studies in Europe 2017. The language of instruction is English. Egyptology is a fee-paying programme; the annual study fee is 70 000 CZK. Description of the entrance examination and evaluation criteria entrance examination: one-round examination, interview Discussion of the project of the PhD dissertation: 0–30 points; Assessment of the Applicant’s previous studies, research and other academic activities: 0–15 points; Assessment of the Applicant’s knowledge of secondary literature (based on the list submitted by the Applicant): 0–15 points. The Programme Board does not suggest or impose particular PhD topics, but allows applicants to suggest research projects according to their personal preferences. Suggested PhD topics must be consulted beforehand with the Chair of the Programme Board. Conditions for admission The applicant is admitted if he/she obtains a minimum of 30 points in the entrance examination and, at the same time, scores enough points to place among the maximum number of students admitted to the respective programme (refer to the Admission Procedure Specifications applicable to the individual degree programmes); admissions will be granted to all applicants who score the same number of points as the applicant who comes last in the ranking of admissions. The full-time and combined forms of study use different maximum numbers of admissions. Applicants cannot be admitted without supplying, no later than on the enrolment day, evidence of their prior education. [-]

PhD in Czech and Czechoslovak History

Charles University Faculty of Education
Campus Full time Part time 4 years September 2017 Czech Republic Prague + 1 more

The graduate of doctoral studying program Czech and Czechoslovak history is equipped with theoretical and practical knowledge in the area of historical work, namely in scientific research as well as teaching history. [+]

The aim of doctoral studies is to prepare qualified researchers in the field of Czech and Czechoslovak history, who will become the mainstay of further historical research. The studies develop special knowledge of doctoral students and provide them with a deeper understanding of the chosen specialization. Via lectures and seminars, doctoral students get acquainted with the latest knowledge of historical science as well as current trends in methodology. The focus of doctoral studies lies in presenting written dissertation thesis of original scholarly work based on the original source base. PhD thesis should extend previous research findings, and doctoral students also demonstrated the ability to handle the topic with adequate methods and at the international level. The applicants submit a project up to 10 pages including bibliography together with their applications. The project topic chosen by themselves usually corresponds with the overall theme, which they would like to pursue during doctoral studies. Description of the entrance examination and evaluation criteria Entrance Examination: Discussion about the project - the applicant must demonstrate their qualifications for scientific work. Emphasis will be placed on the orientation of the scientific production of the chosen topic, the ability to issue partial integration into the general historical context and to formulate own conclusions. Evaluation Criteria: The applicant can get a maximum of ten points, the number of points for the admission to study is getting at least seven points. Conditions for admission Candidates are admitted to study if they meet all admission requirements: a) to deliver a certified copy of completion of Master’s degree programme, b) to pass an entrance examination, reach minimum number of point determined by the Dean, c) to meet any other requirements specified by a given field of study. Information on the exercise of graduates The graduate of doctoral studying program Czech and Czechoslovak history is equipped with theoretical and practical knowledge in the area of historical work, namely in scientific research as well as teaching history. Occupationally the graduate works at universities and high schools, in scientific institutions, museums, galleries and other cultural institutions. [-]

PhD in International Relations and European Studies

University of Nicosia
Campus Full time Part time 3 years September 2017 Cyprus Nicosia Greece Athens + 3 more

The Doctoral Program in International Relations (hereafter IR) aims at the creation and interpretation of knowledge which extends the forefront of the disciple of IR (in the wider reading of the discipline), through original research and critical thinking. [+]

Doctorate Programs in Area Studies in Europe 2017. Duration (years): 3 Qualification Awarded: Doctoral Programme in European Studies and International Relations (PhD,3 years) Level of Qualification: 3rd Cycle (Doctorate) Language of Instruction: English and Greek Mode of Study: Full time / Part time Minimum Credits: 90 Minimum ECTS Credits: 180 Profile of the Programme: General: The Doctoral Program in International Relations (hereafter IR) aims at the creation and interpretation of knowledge which extends the forefront of the disciple of IR (in the wider reading of the discipline), through original research and critical thinking. Holders of a Ph.D. in IR will be able to conceptualize, design and implement projects for the generation of significant new knowledge and/or understanding in the field of International Relations. Furthermore, holders of a Ph.D. in IR will have the qualities needed for employment that requires the ability to make informed judgments on complex issues in specialist topics of IR, and innovation in tackling and solving conceptual and practical problems in world politics. The Doctoral Program in IR is designed in accord with the Framework for Qualifications for Higher Education Area (Barcelona Process) and the European Qualifications Framework (level 8 of EQF), as well as in accord with established standards and practices in European and American Universities that award the title of Doctor of Philosophy in International Relations (hereafter a Ph.D. in IR).1 1 According to international standards and practices, on successful completion, doctorate students in International Relations, who study in Universities where the English language is the language of instruction, are awarded the title ?Doctor of Philosophy in International Relations? (for the Greek διδάκτωρ). Specific: The Doctoral Program in IR will socialize students into the world of academia and to guide them so that they will be well-acquainted with the criteria they are expected to meet for their academic work internationally. Those who complete the Program will be able to engage in academic research independently at the highest level. Ph.D. graduates will also be able to pursue analysis of issues of their expertise at important public and private institutions. The Program prepares and guides students to generate new knowledge of the highest academic caliber. Graduates may pursue careers as academics and scholars at colleges, universities, research centers and think-tanks and other important institutions in both the public and private sectors. The Program may also be very useful to those who aspire to pursue careers in other fields that require major knowledge of topics in international relations, such as government and international organizations. Career Prospects: The Program prepares and guides students to generate new knowledge of the highest academic caliber. Graduates may pursue careers as academics and scholars at colleges, universities, research centers and think-tanks and other important institutions in both the public and private sectors. The Program may also be very useful to those who aspire to pursue careers in other fields that require major knowledge of topics in international relations, such as government and international organizations. Graduation Requirements The degree requires the completion of 180 ECTS out of which 60 ECTS are for the research proposal and the remaining 120 ECTS for the writing of the Dissertation. A doctoral candidate student will qualify for a Ph.D. degree if he/she successfully: (a) completes any required courses included in the MA Programs. (b) presents and defends his/her research proposal. (c) prepares, presents and defend a Ph.D. Dissertation to be examined by a five-member committee. Ph.D. candidates must complete their study in the Ph.D. programme within three academic years at the minimum and eight academic years at the maximum. Learning Outcomes The programme is designed to prepare students for a wide variety of careers in college and university teaching, research, public service, and the private sector. Students successfully completing the programme will: (a) gain a deep knowledge at the most advanced frontier of aspects of modern international relations; (b) acquire the most advanced and specialised skills and techniques, including synthesis and evaluation, required to solve critical problems in research and/or innovation and to extend and redefine existing knowledge and/or professional practice in the field of international relations; (c) develop competence in identifying and evaluating numerous forms of evidence on public events in world politics; (d) gain an understanding of complex theories of, as well as actors and institutions in international relations, and means of evaluating their preferences and outcomes; (e) acquire greater skills in written and oral communication in English. [-]

PhD Research Degrees in Religions and Philosophies

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The SOAS Religions and Philosophies Department offers a vibrant, stimulating, and interdisciplinary research environment. We provide individual research supervision in a wide variety of religious traditions and comparative and interdisciplinary topics. Supervisors are experts in their fields and thoroughly familiar with the religions, cultures, languages, and geographical areas they specialise in. [+]

Research Degrees in Religions and Philosophies The SOAS Religions and Philosophies Department offers a vibrant, stimulating, and interdisciplinary research environment. We provide individual research supervision in a wide variety of religious traditions and comparative and interdisciplinary topics. Supervisors are experts in their fields and thoroughly familiar with the religions, cultures, languages, and geographical areas they specialise in. In addition to individual supervision the Department offers research training at various levels: an obligatory research writing workshop which prepares year 1 MPhil students for their upgrade to the PhD level; a weekly seminar for PhD students in years 2 and 3 to discuss work in progress and receive feedback before submitting their thesis; a departmental research seminar in which both staff and students present papers on their research projects and discuss them in an interdisciplinary setting. Students also have the opportunity to attend seminars, lectures, and conferences offered by the various specialist Centres relating to their particular fields. These centres run regular evening lecture series, workshops, and conferences which host visiting speakers from other universities in Britain, Europe, and globally. As you think about commencing your PhD with us, we invite you to contact a potential supervisor in your area of interest, ideally with a first draft of your project proposal. This member of staff will then advise you on your project and on any questions you might have before making your application. Further Information Research areas and expertise of our academic staff Current PhD research projects and previous thesis titles Procedural and policy information from the Registry’s Postgraduate Research Section Guide on how to write a research proposal [-]

MPhil/PhD Research Degrees in South East Asian Studies

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The Department offers the widest coverage in Europe of research and teaching related to the languages and cultures of the principal countries of South East Asia. Its primary commitment is to the four languages Burmese, Indonesian/Malay, Thai and Vietnamese, and their literatures, cinemas and associated cultures. REF 2014 submissions by members of the Department included significant and paradigm-shifting monographs, edited collections, journal articles and book chapters in cinema and gender, literary criticism, cultural history and postcolonial studies. It is a flourishing and friendly Department with close links to recent alumni. [+]

Doctorate Programs in Area Studies in Europe 2017. Research Degrees in South East Asian Studies The Department offers the widest coverage in Europe of research and teaching related to the languages and cultures of the principal countries of South East Asia. Its primary commitment is to the four languages Burmese, Indonesian/Malay, Thai and Vietnamese, and their literatures, cinemas and associated cultures. REF 2014 submissions by members of the Department included significant and paradigm-shifting monographs, edited collections, journal articles and book chapters in cinema and gender, literary criticism, cultural history and postcolonial studies. It is a flourishing and friendly Department with close links to recent alumni. The research interests of the Department’s members include: classical Malay literature; modern literature in Malay, Indonesian, Thai, and Vietnamese; Islam in South East Asia; language pedagogy; phonetics; gender studies; oral literature and folklore; cinema in South East Asia; and translation. These interests are increasingly reflected in the kind of work that is undertaken by the Department’s current doctoral researchers. A full research training programme is provided at Faculty level, in addition to the close attention each doctoral researcher receives from his or her supervisor. MPhil/PhD students admitted to the Department receive research training in the Faculty-wide first year research training seminar and are also encouraged to participate in discipline-specific training offered by the Faculty Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) and research skills training coordinated via the Doctoral School. The Department provides supervision for both full-time and part-time doctoral researchers undertaking supervised research in a wide range of South East Asian languages and literatures. Theses completed in recent years have included topics in traditional Lao literature, contemporary Thai fiction, the syntax of spoken Mon, the shadow play in Bali, Malay oral literature, schoolbooks in colonial Burma, pre-Angkor Cambodia and political literature in Vietnam. Under the regulations of SOAS, University of London, all doctoral researchers register initially for an MPhil: they may transfer to PhD after completing one year, if they wish and subject to approval by the School, which requires evidence that the candidate’s work is achieving the standard required. The minimum duration for full-time doctoral researchers is two years for the MPhil and three years for the PhD. Part-time doctoral researchers normally take twice as long to complete their studies. When their research is completed, candidates submit a thesis to the examiners, and then attend a viva voce examination. Applicants for postgraduate degrees must have a good command of the language of their field of study, and should normally have a good first degree in the appropriate subject, but students with other qualifications and experience may also be eligible, and applications from mature students are particularly welcome. If necessary for the development of their chosen subject, doctoral researchers will be expected to have or acquire an adequate reading knowledge of Dutch and/or French. All potential applicants are strongly advised to consult the Department before they apply. More general queries should be directed to the Department Research Tutor or to the Doctoral School. Academic Staff and Their Research Areas Dr Ben Murtagh BA MA(LONDON) PHD (LONDON) Head of Department Traditional Malay and modern Indonesian literature; history of Indonesia; film in Indonesia and Malaysia; gender and sexuality in Indonesia Dr Rachel Harrison BA PHD(LONDON) Modern literary, cultural, film and gender studies with reference to Thailand; literary criticism and South East Asian Literatures in a comparative context; Western cinema set in South East Asia Dr Dana Healy PHD(PRAGUE) Admissions Tutor Vietnamese language and literature, language teaching; folk literature, modern poetry, theatre, art Dr David A Smyth BA PHD(LONDON) The Thai novel; Thai literary historiography; Thai language; modern Thai history; language teaching Dr Justin Watkins BA(LEEDS) MA PHD(LONDON) Burmese language and literature; Khmer language; Mon-khmer and Tibeto-Burman languages; phonetics; computer lexicography. [-]

MPhil/PhD Research Degrees in South Asian Studies

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

SOAS has an international reputation for excellence in the field of South Asian studies earned by the world leading research undertaken. REF 2014 submissions by members of the Department included significant and paradigm-shifting monographs, edited collections, journal articles and book chapters on literature, cinema cultural history and postcolonial studies. [+]

Research Degrees in South Asian Studies Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time SOAS has an international reputation for excellence in the field of South Asian studies earned by the world leading research undertaken. REF 2014 submissions by members of the Department included significant and paradigm-shifting monographs, edited collections, journal articles and book chapters on literature, cinema cultural history and postcolonial studies. The Department has two ERC grants: Francesca Orsini for the comparative study of the multilingual literary histories of North India, the Maghreb, and the Horn of Africa; while James Mallinson has one entitled “The Hatha Yoga Project: Mapping traditions of transnational physical yoga practice through philology and ethnography”. Amina Yaqin’s current research projects include a collaboration with the Centre for the Study of Pakistan and the University of East London for the ‘Muslims, Trust and Cultural Dialogue’ research project funded by the RCUK. This follows on from an earlier AHRC funded international research network, ‘Framing Muslims’. Rachel Dwyer is CI on an AHRC funded International Network with the University of Leeds: Soft Power, Cinema and the BRICS. The Department welcomes applications for the degrees of PhD on any topic related to the research interests and disciplines of the Department’s research-active staff. Prospective candidates should consult the details of the various staff members’ research areas and adapt their proposal accordingly. These presently include, but are not limited to: Indian film and screen studies; diaspora studies; postcolonial literature; literary studies associated with Hindi, Urdu, Nepali, and Sanskrit; classical Hinduism; feminism; translation; current representations of Muslims; and the politics of Nepal, Bhutan and Pakistan. Broader topics can be accommodated through joint supervision with colleagues in other Departments and Centres. A full research training programme is provided at Faculty level, in addition to the close attention each doctoral researcher receives from his or her supervisor. MPhil/PhD researchers admitted to the Department receive research training in the Faculty-wide first year research training seminar and are also encouraged to participate in discipline-specific training offered by the Faculty Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) and research skills training coordinated via the Doctoral School. Under the regulations of SOAS, University of London, all doctoral researchers register initially for an MPhil: they may transfer to PhD after completing one year, if they wish and subject to approval by the School, which requires evidence that the candidate’s work is achieving the standard required. The minimum duration for full-time doctoral researchers is two years for the MPhil and three years for the PhD. Part-time researchers normally take twice as long to complete their studies. When their research is completed, candidates submit a thesis to the examiners, and then attend a viva voce examination. A list of both current and recently completed PhD projects can be consulted, and a list of current staff members and their research interests are available Would-be candidates are strongly encouraged to make initial contact with a prospective supervisor in the first instance, and well in advance of submitting their application, to discuss their proposed research. More general queries should be directed to the Department Research Tutor or to the Doctoral School. [-]

PhD Degree in Politics and International Studies

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The Department of Politics and International Studies accepts students for research work leading to a PhD. The primary aim of the PhD programme is to train students to design, research and write a successful doctoral thesis. Those who have completed the doctorate will be familiar with the conceptual and methodological aspects of political research and qualified as experts in their field. [+]

Doctorate Programs in Area Studies in Europe 2017. PhD Degree in Politics and International Studies The Department of Politics and International Studies accepts students for research work leading to a PhD. The primary aim of the PhD programme is to train students to design, research and write a successful doctoral thesis. Those who have completed the doctorate will be familiar with the conceptual and methodological aspects of political research and qualified as experts in their field. To be considered for entry into the PhD programme, applicants must possess a good advanced degree in Politics equivalent in level and content to the Department's MSc, although applications from individuals with related degrees in cognate disciplines will also be considered. Admission takes place on a rolling basis. The application cycle opens in November and closes on 30 June for entry in October. Applicants also wishing to be considered for a SOAS scholarship or an ESRC studentship should refer to the Scholarship information for the deadlines. The primary building block of the PhD programme is the relationship between student and supervisor. Students are admitted on the basis of the expressed willingness of at least one member of staff to serve as the main supervisor for the student's project. Thus, from the student's entry in the programme, the supervisor assumes primary responsibility for monitoring and supporting the student’s progress towards the completion of the degree. Every research student also has an associate supervisor, another member of staff with a close interest in the student’s region and/or sub-field of the discipline. The Department’s research tutor oversees the PhD programme and is available for discussing general problems. Furthermore, research students are embedded in a structured training programme during their first year, attending courses dealing with research design, theory and methods. In addition, they may attend an MSc course relevant to their research. Research students are also encouraged to participate in the Department seminars, where invited scholars from other institutions give presentations, and they have access to many other seminars and lectures held throughout SOAS. The School’s language training facilities are also available for students to develop or improve research-relevant language skills. Since 2012, research students have exclusive access to the facilities and services offered by SOAS’ Doctoral School. Most PhD students spend some time doing fieldwork in the regions of their research. The Department and the School, through their various connections with individuals and institutions in the universities and governments of Asia, Africa and the Middle East, facilitate this work with personal contacts and introductions as well as (limited) funding. The Department usually has around 60 research students (MPhil and PhD level) at any one time. Please visit these links for profiles of current research students and a list of recently completed PhD theses. [-]

MPhil/PhD Research Degrees in Near and Middle Eastern Studies

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Please check the list of the staff of the Department provides information on the main areas of teaching and research, and supervision for research students can be provided across this wide range. [+]

Research Degrees in Near and Middle Eastern Studies The list of the staff of the Department provides information on the main areas of teaching and research, and supervision for research students can be provided across this wide range. Some Recent Research Theses Siba Aldabbagh Word and Image in Visual Art and Poetry from the Arab World Charis Bredin Creaturely Encounters: Animals in the Libyan literary imaginary Izabella Czyzewska How to Pray to Hittite Gods: A Semantic andContextual Analysis of Hittite Prayer Terminology with the New Editions of Selected Prayers of Muršili II Maria De Cillis The Discourse of Compromise: Theoretical Constructs of Free Will and Predestination in the Works of Avicenna, Ghazālī and Ibn ʿArabī. Jacob Eriksson Swedish mediation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: a study of the utility of small-state mediation and Track II diplomacy. Benjamin Geer Priests of the Nation: Nationalism and Power in Modern Egyptian Literature and Cinema. Alyn D. Hine Russian Literature in the Works of Mikhail Nu'ayma Christie Johnson Authorship in Kitab al-aghani: production, reception, subjectivit Walid Khazendar Place in the Making: A Study on Image-Making in Early Arabic Poetry. Maha Abdel Megeed Muwaylihi's Isa ibn Hisham: Between 18th-Century Revival and 19th-Century Neoclassical Renaissance Krikor Moskofian Literature and Survival: Literary Criticism and the Construction of Cultural Identity in Armenian Printed Press of Diaspora 1919-1928. Khadiga Musa A Critical Edition of a Twelve/Eighteenth Century Manuscript on Legal Maxims: ‘Umdat al-Nazir fi’l-Ashbāh wa’l-Naẓā`ir. Laetitia Nanquette The Eye Sees Not Itself: Images of France and Iran Through Their Literatures (1979-2009). Hany Rashwan Literariness and aesthetics in ancient Egyptian literature: towards an Arabic-based critical approach - Jinās as a case study. Luis Siddall The reign of Adad-narari III. Ludek Vacín Shulgi of Ur: Life, Deeds, Ideology and Legacy of a Mesopotamian Ruler as Reflected Primarily in Literary Texts. Lisa Wilhelmi The Akkadian of Boğazköy Academic Staff and their Research Areas Professor Muhammad A S Abdel Haleem BA (Cairo) PHD (Cantab) FCIL (London) Qur’an, Hadith, Tafsir; Islam in society; classical and modern Arabic literature Dr George Dedes BA MA PhD (Harvard) Early Anatolian Turkish; Ottoman language and literature; Ottoman history; Turkish-Greek relations; modern Turkish culture Dr Ayman El-Desouky BA (American Univ. Cairo) MA PhD (Austin, Texas) Comparative literature, 19th and 20th-century Arabic literature, hermeneutics, modern philosophy and theory Professor Andrew R George BA PhD (Birmingham) FBA Cuneiform and Ancient Mesopotamian studies Dr Marlé Hammond BA MA PhD (Columbia University) Classical and Modern Arabic Literature and Poetics; Egyptian and Arabic Cinemas; Women's Writing; Folkloric Narrative Professor Hugh Kennedy PhD (Cantab) Medieval history of Arabic-speaking lands Dr Karima Laachir BA (Abdelmalek Essadi University, Tetouan Morocco) MA PhD (Leeds) PGCHE (Birmingham) Comparative postcolonial literature (Arabophone, Francophone and Anglophone), Arabic popular culture, Diasporic cultural productions,literature of the North African diaspora (Beur), exclusion of ethnic minorities in Europe with a specific focus on France, postcolonialism and colonial legacies, Islam and Islamophobia. Dr Chris Lucas BA (SOAS) MA PhD (Cantab) Grammatical change and the interface between syntax, semantics and pragmatics in Arabic and other Afro-Asiatic languages, and in English and other (Indo-)European languages. Dr Nima Mina BA (Marburg) MMus PhD (Montreal) Classical and Modern Persian literature, Orientalism in 18th-20thcentury Europe, Middle Eastern minority writers in Europe, Diaspora studies, music performance, translation studies Professor Wen-Chin Ouyang BA BEd (Tripoli) MA MPhil PhD (Columbia University) Classical and modern Arabic literature, The 1001 Nights and Arabic Popular Epics, Classical and modern Arabic Critical thought and theory, Networks of Circulation and World Literature, Semiotics of the Visual Dr Mustafa Shah BA PhD (London) The early Arabic linguistic tradition; classical Islamic theology and jurisprudence Dr Ayman Shihadeh BA (London) MSt (Oxon) DPhil (Oxon) Arabic philosophy; Islamic theology; ethical theory in Islam; Arabic paleography and codicology Professor Stefan Sperl BA (Oxon) PhD (London) Classical Arabic literature, medieval Arabic popular literature; court poetry and oral literature; refugee studies Dr Yair Wallach BSc MA PhD (University of London) Culture, Society and History of modern Israel/Palestine; Visual and Material Culture; Urban Studies; Israel-Palestine Conflict Dr Mark Weeden Hittite, Akkadian language and literature in Syria [-]

MPhil/PhD Research Degrees in Music

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Staff and students of the Department of Music pursue research on a wide range of subjects, mainly but not exclusively focused on the music of Asia and Africa. Staff have special interests in the music of China and Central Asia (Harris), Korea (Howard), Japan, Indonesia and Thailand (Gray), India and Nepal (Widdess), the Islamic Middle East (Wright), the Jewish world (Wood), West Africa and Cuba (Durán) and South and East Africa (Impey). But research is not limited to these areas: projects have been undertaken on American jazz, and on Caribbean, Mediterranean and Eastern European music, for example. [+]

Doctorate Programs in Area Studies in Europe 2017. Research Degrees in Music Subjects of research Staff and students of the Department of Music pursue research on a wide range of subjects, mainly but not exclusively focused on the music of Asia and Africa. Staff have special interests in the music of China and Central Asia (Harris), Korea (Howard), Japan, Indonesia and Thailand (Gray), India and Nepal (Widdess), the Islamic Middle East (Wright), the Jewish world (Wood), West Africa and Cuba (Durán) and South and East Africa (Impey). But research is not limited to these areas: projects have been undertaken on American jazz, and on Caribbean, Mediterranean and Eastern European music, for example. Staff often have research interests in issues that cross regional boundaries; see the Department Staff page for a summary of their interests, and select the name of a lecturer for further details of their individual research specialisms and activities. Whatever its regional origin, music is studied as a cultural phenomenon, and also from analytical and historical perspectives. Instrumental and vocal, sacred and secular, art and popular, traditional and modern musical forms are all of equal interest. Research methods employed include fieldwork, interview, archive research, recording and filming, performance, transcription and analysis, and composition. Entry requirements Postgraduate students of the Department come from a wide variety of backgrounds in the UK and from overseas. Most are performers of music as well as researchers; applicants are evaluated individually on the basis of their background and academic achievements. Applicants should normally possess a Master’s degree, or equivalent, in Music, Ethnomusicology or other relevant discipline. Applicants who are accomplished performers or teachers, or who work in the music industry, may have alternative qualifications, and are encouraged to apply. Research training and coursework All research students are required to follow a course of research training held in the department in their first year. In addition they may be required to take one or more postgraduate courses, such as the MMus core course Ethnomusicology in Practice, and/or a language course, depending on their prior qualifications and the requirements of their research project. They are also expected to attend department research seminars; and they may be recommended to attend research training workshops elsewhere in SOAS, or in institutions such as the Institute for Musical Research (http://music.sas.ac.uk/training). See “Structure” for more information about the place of research training in the structure of the programme. Supervision Each research student is allocated a Supervisory Committee, comprising the First Supervisor, who will be primarily responsible for guiding the student’s research; the Second Supervisor, who is available for periodic consultation; and the Third Supervisor, normally the Research Tutor. The Committee as a group periodically assess the student’s progress (see Structure). Research students are welcome to consult any members of the Department of Music about their research. Where the project is inter-disciplinary, the Second Supervisor can be a member of another department. Funding For links to available sources of funding for research see: http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/ Students from outside the UK may be eligible for financial support from their country of origin. Residence requirements MPhil/PhD students are required to be resident in London, with the following exceptions: In Year 2, you may spend up to 12 months overseas on fieldwork. In Year 4, you may apply for permission to work away from SOAS (this does not affect your fees). Part-present or Distance Learning research degrees are not currently available. How to apply If the subject you are thinking of researching coincides with the research interests of one or more members of academic staff, you are welcome to contact them to discuss your project before applying. If you are not sure how your projects fits in with the department’s subject coverage, or if you have any other question about the department or the research programme in general, you may contact the Research Tutor. When you are ready to apply, please do so online at https://app.hobsons.co.uk/AYApplicantLogin/fl_ApplicantLogin.asp?id=soas In considering your application, the Registry will advise the department as to whether your academic qualifications meet the normal requirements for MPhil/PhD at SOAS, and whether you meet English language requirements. The Department will consider your background and experience more generally, your research proposal, and your references. We will pay particular attention to the questions: is your project one that can reasonably be completed within 4 years (or part time equivalent), taking into account any difficulties there may be in working in particular parts of the world; do you have the appropriate subject knowledge and skills, or can these be provided at SOAS as part of your research training (you may be recommended to take a Master’s degree first before commencing research); do you communicate effectively in written English; do your referees confirm that you have the ability to carry out this research; can the Department provide appropriate supervision? Please ask your referees to note the questions on the reference form and respond to them as far as possible in their reference. Your referees should have personal knowledge of your academic and/or musical (performance, composition etc.) work. 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MPhil/PhD Research Degrees in Japanese and Korean Studies

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The Department is able to supervise MPhil and PhD degrees by research and thesis in a wide range of cultural and linguistic subjects. Intending research students should not feel constrained to limit their choice of topics to those indicated against the names of current staff members (postgraduate students have recently been working on a range of topics that include Japanese cinema, Kabuki texts, modern Japanese linguistics and literature, Meiji historical texts, Korean linguistics and literature, Korean colonial and eighteenth century history). Research undertaken at MPhil and PhD level is based on literary, documentary, and archive material available at SOAS and also gathered during fieldwork in Japan and Korea. [+]

Research Degrees in Japanese and Korean Studies The Department is able to supervise MPhil and PhD degrees by research and thesis in a wide range of cultural and linguistic subjects. Intending research students should not feel constrained to limit their choice of topics to those indicated against the names of current staff members (postgraduate students have recently been working on a range of topics that include Japanese cinema, Kabuki texts, modern Japanese linguistics and literature, Meiji historical texts, Korean linguistics and literature, Korean colonial and eighteenth century history). Research undertaken at MPhil and PhD level is based on literary, documentary, and archive material available at SOAS and also gathered during fieldwork in Japan and Korea. Academic Staff and their Research Areas Professor Stephen H Dodd BA (Oxon) MA PhD (Columbia) Admissions Tutor – Japanese Modern Japanese literature, with particular interest in representations of the native place (furusato), gender/sexuality and modernity Professor Andrew Gerstle BA (Columbia) MA (Waseda) PhD (Harvard) Japanese literature, drama and thought, primarily of the Tokugawa period, with particular interest in Bunraku and Kabuki theatre and the plays of Chikamatsu Dr Anders Karlsson MA PhD (Stockholm) Research Tutor – Korean (Term 2) Korean language; literature and society; history of 19th century Korea Dr Griseldis Kirsch MA PhD (Trier) Lecturer in Contemporary Japanese Culture Contemporary Japanese culture, with particular interest in Japanese visual media and popular culture Dr Grace Koh BA (American Univ. Paris) MST, DPhil (Oxford) Korean and East Asian literary traditions (prose and fiction); literary and intellectual history; travel literature and cultural encounters; critical theory and comparative literature Dr Owen Miller BA MA PhD (London) Research Tutor – Korean (Terms 1 and 3) Social and economic history of late 19th and early 20th century Korea; urban history; Korean nationalist and Marxist historiographies; economic history of North Korea Dr Barbara Pizziconi BA (Rome) MA (Tokyo Univ. Foreign Languages) PhD (Naples) Japanese applied linguistics; language teaching methodology; second language acquisition with emphasis on pragmatic aspects; linguistic politeness Dr Nana Sato-Rossberg History of Translation Studies in Japan, Intergeneric translations (manga to film), Translation of oral narratives or orality, Cultural translation, The relationship between translation and power Dr Isolde Standish BA (Ballarat) BA, PhD (London) Reader in Film and Media Studies Japanese and Korean cinema Professor Jae Hoon Yeon BA MA (Seoul) PhD (London) Head of Department Korean language and linguistics, especially morphosyntax and linguistic typology; structure and history of Korean language; Korean language teaching and translation; modern Korean literature [-]

MPhil/PhD in International Development

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Students may follow the PhD pathway in International Development by being based at either SOAS, LSHTM or IoE. All PhD students on the International Development pathway will attend an advanced research training seminar run by LIDC. The series will provide students in the ESRC Doctoral Training Centre's International Development Pathway with a broad understanding of interdisciplinary approaches to development, and a detailed understanding of selected areas of interest. [+]

Doctorate Programs in Area Studies in Europe 2017. MPhil/PhD in International Development Students may follow the PhD pathway in International Development by being based at either SOAS, LSHTM or IoE. All PhD students on the International Development pathway will attend an advanced research training seminar run by LIDC. The series will provide students in the ESRC Doctoral Training Centre's International Development Pathway with a broad understanding of interdisciplinary approaches to development, and a detailed understanding of selected areas of interest. All MPhil/PhD in International Development research students will participate in the compulsory course work and attend research student seminars in the college and department where they are registered for the MPhil/PhD. At SOAS the Economics and Development Studies departments hold seminar series and students will be expected to involve themselves in the work of the relevant research clusters. Admissions Process There are three admissions routes to the MPhil and PhD in International Development: The 1+3 structure: Following successful completion of the MSc Research for International Development at SOAS. ESRC 1+3 studentships are available to fund this route. The +3 structure: By direct applications for MPhil/PhD in International Development admission. ESRC 1+3 studentships are available to fund route. The 4 structure: not currently available at SOAS. [-]

PhD Research Degrees in History

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Although some theses rely mainly on materials in English and other European languages, a major advantage of taking a research degree in history at SOAS is that the School can provide instruction in many African and Asian languages. Students requiring such instruction are advised to mention it at the time of application, and to discuss arrangements with prospective supervisors as early as possible after receiving an offer. [+]

Research Degrees in History The SOAS History Department is one of the world’s major centres offering supervision for research degrees in African and Asian history. It attracts students and scholarly visitors from all parts of the world. The top ratings given to the Department in the official national research assessments of 1996, 2001 and 2008 took into account the excellence of its research training, as well as the staff publication record. The Department provides opportunities for well-qualified applicants to join large groups of students and SOAS students have unrestricted and usually free access to a huge range of seminars, conferences and workshops being held in SOAS or within easy reach. Most importantly, they attend a weekly regional history seminar – on Africa, South Asia, the Near and Middle East, East Asia, or South East Asia – and often special workshops on themes related to their research. Close links are maintained with the nearby Institute of Historical Research and the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, which run their own research seminars. These give research students many opportunities to meet scholars who are visiting SOAS, and those based elsewhere in the University of London or in Britain. Attendance at classes forming part of taught courses in SOAS or elsewhere may also be possible by arrangement. Library holdings in London are superb for many of the subjects studied in the Department. SOAS history students have free access to the nearby British Library (including the India Office and Oriental Collections), to the British Library Newspaper Library at Colindale, to the National Archives, and to a vast array of other collections, including the libraries of most other London colleges and universities. How to Apply Minimum Entry Requirements: a BA and/or MA degree in History, with a merit or equivalent in the Masters Degree and a MA dissertation grade of 65% or higher. Applicants must provide a clear and coherent research proposal of 2000 words. Inquiries relating to possible research topics should be directed in the first instance to the member of staff whose interests conform most nearly to those of the prospective student. For information on general or technical matters, please see below and the tab ‘structure’. Inquiries on such matters should be sent either to Research Admission, dsadmissions@soas.ac.uk, or the History Research Tutor. Offers of admission will be made on the basis of an applicant’s academic record, references and proposed topic. Those wishing to be considered for scholarships from or through SOAS are advised to make their applications as early as possible (for example, before January in the year of entry), as in most cases only those who are already holding the offer of a place will be considered for an award. Although some theses rely mainly on materials in English and other European languages, a major advantage of taking a research degree in history at SOAS is that the School can provide instruction in many African and Asian languages. Students requiring such instruction are advised to mention it at the time of application, and to discuss arrangements with prospective supervisors as early as possible after receiving an offer. [-]

MPhil/PhD in Development Studies

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The Department currently has 52 research students, working on a range of research topics in many parts of Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East. We are particularly interested in potential research students who wish to work in one of the main Departmental Research Clusters, namely: Labour, Movements and Development; Neoliberalism, Globalisation, and States; Violence, Peace and Development; Water for Africa; Migration, Mobility and Development; Agrarian Change and Development; Development Policy, Aid, Institutions and Poverty Reduction. [+]

Doctorate Programs in Area Studies in Europe 2017. MPhil/PhD in Development Studies The Department currently has 52 research students, working on a range of research topics in many parts of Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East. We are particularly interested in potential research students who wish to work in one of the main Departmental Research Clusters, namely: Labour, Movements and Development; Neoliberalism, Globalisation, and States; Violence, Peace and Development; Water for Africa; Migration, Mobility and Development; Agrarian Change and Development; Development Policy, Aid, Institutions and Poverty Reduction Research students are encouraged to attend weekly training sessions to introduce them to a number of practical techniques and vocational skills utilised within the development profession; fortnightly seminars on topics relevant to Development Studies and, where appropriate, post-experience workshops. For all queries regarding applications and proposals please contact the the Research Admissions Tutor, Dr Jens Lerche. Year One Students are expected to upgrade from MPhil to PhD status after their first year. It is expected that you will meet your assigned Supervisor in your first week at SOAS, and that, in consultation with your Supervisor, you will choose two other academics to serve on your research committee. During the module of your first year, you are required to attend the Department’s Postgraduate Research Training Seminar. These sessions will provide you with the essential training in research methodology and will assist you in getting started: specifically, they will assist you in writing the constituent components of the ‘upgrade paper’ that you have to submit and defend in a viva in Term 3 of your first year. Given the wealth of training resources in research methods and other theoretically and empirically relevant postgraduate modules across the Faculty and in other Faculties at SOAS, students are strongly encouraged to audit modules. Additional modules can be invaluable, especially for conceptual or area specific issues or topics, as ways to supplement the training imparted in the MPhil Seminars. The supervisor and the student will discuss at the beginning of the year the most suitable portfolio of training and modules in relation to the topic of the thesis, its main research questions and the setting in which the research will be conducted. Schedule after the first year Once students have passed their upgrade, they should immediately proceed with designing the details of the empirical work and organising the drafts written in the module of the first year. As most Development Studies students will embark on fieldwork in their second year, it is important to keep the 3-year time limit in mind, and to not postpone writing chapters until after the completion of fieldwork. Any writing done during that period will save crucial time on return. Ordinarily, a student would then adhere to the following writing up schedule: Terms 4, 5 and 6: Fieldwork, and beginning of data processing as well as drawing up of chapter templates; Summer vacation of the second year, terms 7 and 8: Data analysis and back to literature review to revise initial chapters and producing a full final draft; Term 9: Reviewing the first draft, complete any required rewriting, and submission of dissertation. There is a possibility of continuation of writing-up after term 9 but the thesis will have to be submitted in any case before the end of the 4th year. This will be the final deadline although the thesis is expected to be finished within three years of full-time active research. [-]