Apr 19, 2018 at 12:00am ET By Alyssa Walker

In March, the world lost its brightest star in the fields of physics and cosmology.  But Stephen Hawking didn't depart the mortal coil without leaving the world one final gift.  According to reports, Hawking was working on a final paper just days before his death on March 14. The paper, co-authored with Thomas Hertog, a theoretical physicist at the University of Leuven, is currently under review. Whether that paper will reveal groundbreaking discoveries or not is, for now, a matter for speculation.  But that doesn't mean you can't get your fill of Stephen Hawking's remarkable life's work. 

Last October, the University of Cambridge uploaded his 1966 thesis, "Properties of expanding universes," to the website. On the first day of its release, over two million people viewed it. And since his death, Stephen Hawking's thesis was viewed more than 250,000 times. 

It's been so popular that it's crashed the website.

When he made it available, he said he hoped to "inspire people." 

In an article on the BBC's website, Dr. Arthur Smith, deputy head of scholarly communication at Cambridge University Library said, "It's evidence of the enduring legacy of Professor Hawking that people are still interested in learning about his ideas and theories. His work questions preconceptions of where we are in the world and the universe - questions a lot of people ask themselves."

You can read his thesis here. And if you want more information about Hawking's most recent investigation into the universe, check out his last published interview on the BBC.

Learn more about physics.

Alyssa Walker is a freelance writer, educator, and nonprofit consultant. She lives in the White Mountains of New Hampshire with her family.

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